1887

Abstract

Summary

The effect of passive immunotherapy with antisera against heat-killed and three of its exo-enzymes (elastase, alkaline protease and exotoxin A) in gut-derived sepsis was evaluated. Mice were given a suspension of strain D4 in their drinking water, together with ampicillin (200 mg/kg) to disrupt the normal bacterial flora. Cyclophosphamide was then administered to induce translocation of that had colonised the gastrointestinal tract so that gut-derived septicaemia was produced. In this model, intraperitoneal administration of antiserum against heat-killed bacteria, 100 l/mouse, twice a day for 3 consecutive days significantly increased the survival rate over that of mice treated with normal rabbit serum. Antiserum against elastase, alkaline protease, or a combination of these two antisera, failed to provide significant protection. In contrast, antiserum against exotoxin A significantly increased the survival rate over that of mice treated with normal rabbit serum. These results indicate that passive immunisation with antiserum against heat-killed bacteria and exotoxin A, but not with antiserum against either elastase or alkaline protease, protects mice against gut-derived sepsis caused by .

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-48-8-765
1999-08-01
2019-10-21
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-48-8-765
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