1887

Abstract

The natural antibiotic susceptibility of 38 , 35 , 23 and 20 strains was examined. MIC values were determined by a microdilution procedure and evaluated by a table calculation programme. was the least susceptible sp. and was naturally resistant to tetracyclines, some penicillins, older cephalosporins, sulphamethoxazole and fosfomycin and to antibiotics to which other species of Enterobacteriaceae are also resistant. It was naturally sensitive to modern penicillins and cephalosporins, carbapenems and aztreonam, but its susceptibility to aminoglycosides and quinolones was difficult to assess. and strains were the most susceptible spp. They were naturally sensitive or intermediate to tetracyclines and sensitive to aminoglycosides and quinolones. Susceptibility to sparfloxacin, biapenem and sulphamethoxazole permitted the discrimination of and strains. The natural antibiotic susceptibility of strains was between that of and that of the other providenciae. was resistant to tetracyclines and fosfomycin, but more susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, fosfomycin and numerous β-lactam antibiotics than . A database is described of the natural antibiotic susceptibilities of spp. It can be used for the validation of antibiotic susceptibility test results of these micro-organisms.

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1998-07-01
2022-01-28
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