1887

Abstract

Exposure of to gentamicin 5 mg/L for 4 h resulted in the killing of most extracellular bacteria, but had no effect on the survival of bacteria inside macrophages. Higher concentrations of gentamicin caused a reduction in the number of intracellular bacteria. This effect was associated with cellular uptake of gentamicin, but was unaffected by activation of macrophages by interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide. In experiments in which exposure to gentamicin 5 mg/L for 4 h was used to kill extracellular bacteria, killing by activated macrophages was impaired when O production was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, but not when nitric oxide production was blocked by -monomethyl--arginine. These data suggest that the reactive oxygen intermediates are more important than nitric oxide in the killing of , at least in macrophages activated

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-47-3-211
1998-03-01
2022-01-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/47/3/medmicro-47-3-211.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-47-3-211&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Gaillard J.-L., Berche P., Mounier J., Richard S., Sansonetti P. In vitro model of penetration and intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes in the human enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. Infect Immun 1987; 55:2822–2829
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Kuhn M., Kathariou S., Goebel W. Hemolysin supports survival but not entry of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Infect Immun 1988; 56:79–82
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Kathariou S., Pine L., George V., Carlone G. M., Holloway B. P. Nonhemolytic Listeria monocytogenes mutants that are also noninvasive for mammalian cells in culture: evidence for coordinate regulation of virulence. Infect Immun 1990; 58:3988–3995
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Gaillard J.-L., Berche P., Frehel C., Gouin E., Cossart P. Entry of L. monocytogenes into cells is mediated by intemalin, a repeat protein reminiscent of surface antigens for gram-positive cocci. Cell 1991; 65:1127–1141
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kohler S., Bubert A., Vogel M., Goebel W. Expression of the iap gene coding for protein p60 of Listeria monocytogenes is controlled on the posttranscriptional level. J Bacteriol 1991; 173:4668–4674
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cossart P., Vicente M. F., Mengaud J., Baquero F., Perez-Diaz J. C., Berche P. Listeriolysin O is essential for virulence of Listeria monocytogenes: direct evidence obtained by gene complementation. Infect Immun 1989; 57:3629–3636
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Nishibori T., Cooray K., Xiong H., Kawamura I., Fujita M., Mitsuyama M. Correlation between the presence of virulence-associated genes as determined by PCR and actual virulence to mice in various strains of Listeria spp. Microbiol Immunol 1995; 39:343–349
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kaufmann S. H. E. Acquired resistance to facultative intracellular bacteria: relationship between persistence, cross-reactivity at the T-cell level, and capacity to stimulate cellular immunity of different Listeria strains. Infect Immun 1984; 45:234–241
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Czuprynski C. J., Henson P. M., Campbell P. A. Enhanced accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages mediated by transfer of T cells from mice immunized with Listeria monocytogenes. J Immunol 1985; 134:3449–3454
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Portnoy D. A., Schreiber R. D., Connelly P., Tilney L. G. y Interferon limits access of Listeria monocytogenes to the macrophage cytoplasm. J Exp Med 1989; 170:2141–2146
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Nathan C. F., Murray H. W., Wiebe M. E., Rubin B. Y. Identification of interferon-γ as the lymphokine that activates human macrophage oxidative metabolism and antimicrobial activity. J Exp Med 1983; 158:670–689
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Martin J. H., Edwards S. W. Interferon-γ enhances monocyte cytotoxicity via enhanced reactive oxygen intermediate production. Absence of an effect on macrophage cytotoxicity is due to failure to enhance reactive nitrogen intermediate production. Immunology 1994; 81:592–597
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Nathan C. F., Hibbs J. B. Role of nitric oxide synthesis in macrophage antimicrobial activity. Curr Opin Immunol 1991; 3:65–70
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Xu S., Cooper A., Sturgill-Koszycki S. Intracellular trafficking in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium-infected macrophages. J Immunol 1994; 153:2568–2578
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Drevets D. A., Canono B. P., Leenen P. J. M., Campbell P. A. Gentamicin kills intracellular Listeria monocytogenes. Infect Immun 1994; 62:2222–2228
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Xiong H., Kawamura I., Nishibori T., Mitsuyama M. Suppression of IFN-γ production from Listeria monocytogenes-specific T cells by endogenously produced nitric oxide. Cell Immunol 1996; 172:118–125
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Brown K. B., Percival A. Penetration of antimicrobials into tissue culture cells and leucocytes. Scand J Infect Dis 1978 Suppl 14251–260
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Michelet C., Avril J. L., Cartier F., Berche P. Inhibition of intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes by antibiotics. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1994; 38:438–446
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Nussler A. K., Billiar T. R. Inflammation, immunoregulation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. J Leukoc Biol 1993; 54:171–178
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Liew F. Y., Millott S., Parkinson C., Palmer R. M. J., Moncada S. Macrophage killing of Leishmania parasite in vivo is mediated by nitric oxide from L-arginine. J Immunol 1990; 144:4794–4797
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Adams L. B., Hibbs J. B., Taintor R. R., Krahenbuhl J. L. Microbiostatic effect of murine-activated macrophages for Toxoplasma gondii. Role for synthesis of inorganic nitrogen oxides from L-arginine. J Immunol 1990; 144:2725–2729
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Flesch I. E. A., Kaufmann S. H. E. Mechanisms involved in mycobacterial growth inhibition by gamma interferon-activated bone marrow macrophages: role of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Infect Immun 1991; 59:3213–3218
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Beckerman K. P., Rogers H. W., Corbett J. A., Schreiber R. D., McDaniel M. L., Unanue E. R. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation. Its role in resistance to Listeria monocytogenes. J Immunol 1993; 150:888–895
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Leenen P. J. M., Canono B. P., Drevets D. A., Voerman J. S. A., Campbell P. A. TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulate a macrophage precursor cell line to kill Listeria monocytogenes in a nitric oxide-independent manner. J Immunol 1994; 153:5141–5147
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Inoue S., Itagaki S.-I., Amano F. Intracellular killing of Listeria monocytogenes in the J774.1 macrophage-like cell line and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-resistant mutant LPS 1916 cell line defective in the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates after LPS treatment. Infect Immun 1995; 63:1876–1886
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Samsom J. N., Langermans J. A. M., Groeneveld P. H. P., van Furth R. Acquired resistance against a secondary infection with Listeria monocytogenes in mice is not dependent on reactive nitrogen intermediates. Infect Immun 1996; 64:1197–1202
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-47-3-211
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-47-3-211
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error