1887

Abstract

Inoculation of phorbol ester-differentiated U937 cells as a model for human macrophages with of the urogenital serovar K resulted in a persistent infection, with maximal growth at day 7, until day 10 post-infection. At these times inclusion bodies were present in 0.5–2% of the cells. Typical inclusion bodies containing elementary bodies and reticulate bodies were observed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, single chlamydial particles resembling atypical elementary or intermediate bodies were identified in the cytoplasm in > 80% of the host cells. IFN- exerts antichlamydial activity in epithelial and fibroblastoid cells, but the infection of U937 cells by was not affected by IFN-. The activity of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) was not detected in untreated or in IFN--treated or chlamydiae-infected or mock-infected U937 cells. The presence of atypical persisting chlamydiae and the lack of IDO expression in U937 cells indicates that the development of these atypical bacteria is independent from IFN--mediated tryptophan deprivation and other IFN--mediated effects. Evaluation of persistently infected cells revealed that the expression of the chlamydial major outer-membrane protein, heat-shock protein (hsp60) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens was not significantly altered in the course of the culture. An intense staining of the LPS on the surface of the host cells was demonstrated by immunofluorescence. The data show that phorbol ester-differentiated U937 cells restrict chlamydial growth strongly but not completely through a mechanismxd distinct from IDO-mediated tryptophan deprivation. The mechanisms of persistence of chlamydiae in monocytes, which differ considerably from those described for other cells, require further investigation.

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1998-02-01
2022-01-21
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