1887

Abstract

Summary

To study the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of liver and spleen abscesses and correlate the results with predisposing factors, potential causes and routes of infection, clinical and laboratory data of 48 patients with liver abscesses and 29 with spleen abscesses treated between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed retrospectively. in liver abscesses, a total of 116 isolates (2.4 isolates/specimen) was obtained; 43 were aerobic and facultative species (0.9 isolates/specimen) and 73 were anaerobic species or micro-aerophilic streptococci (1.5 isolates/specimen). Aerobic bacteria only were isolated from 12 (25%) abscesses, anaerobic bacteria only from eight (17%), and mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from 28 (58%); polymicrobial infection was present in 38 (79%). the predominant aerobic and facultative isolates were (11 isolates), group D (8), (5) and (4). the predominant anaerobes were spp. (18 isolates), spp. (13), spp. (10), spp. (10) and spp. (4). There were 12 isolates of micro-aerophilic streptococci. and β-haemolytic streptococci were associated with trauma; group D, and spp. with biliary disease; and spp. and spp. with colonic disease. in splenic abscesses, a total of 56 isolates (1.9 isolates/specimen) was obtained; 23 were aerobic and facultative species (0.8 isolates/specimen), 31 were anaerobic species or micro-aerophilic streptococci (1.1 isolates/specimen) and two were . Aerobic bacteria only were isolated from nine (31%) abscesses, anaerobic bacteria from eight (28%), mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from 10 (34%) and in two (7%); polymicrobial infection was present in 16 (55%). the predominant aerobic and facultative isolates were (5 isolates), (3), group D (3), (3) and (4). the predominant anaerobes were spp. (11 isolates), spp. (5), spp. (3) and spp. (3). and group D were associated with endocarditis, with urinary tract and abdominal infection, spp. and spp. with abdominal infection and spp. with respiratory infection.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-47-12-1075
1998-12-01
2022-05-18
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