1887

Abstract

Summary

Thirty clinical isolates of from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in the UK and Denmark were characterised, together with other clinical isolates and laboratory strains of and . Outer-membrane protein (OMP) profiles were determined, and the organisms were typed genotypically by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after DNA restriction analyses with I and I. This latter method revealed four clusters among the clinical isolates studied; one of these contained isolates of the UK and intercontinental CF epidemic lineage ET12, a cluster which appeared to contain three subtypes. Each of the four clusters appeared less closely related to laboratory strains of than were laboratory strains of , but more closely related to both these species than to . Two types of OMP profile were distinguished among the clinical isolates and strains, and were designated A and B. In type A isolates the major proteins had mol. wts of 39, 27 and 18 kDa. Type B strains additionally contained a group of proteins in the size range 80–90 kDa, although detection of these depended upon the conditions for sample denaturation. In most cases, the OMP type correlated with the genotype, suggesting that examination of OMPs might be of value in the initial characterisation of isolates.

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1998-11-01
2022-01-22
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