1887

Abstract

Although does not generally produce urease, several studies have reported urease-positive isolates from clinical sources. Recently, studies have shown a complete coincidence between the urease-producing phenotype of strains and the possession of the thermostable direct haemolysin (TDH)-related haemolysin (TRH) gene (). TRH, like TDH, is considered to be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of gastroenteritis. The present study attempted to identify the gene encoding urease in to clarify the relationship between urease production and possession of The polymerase chain reaction with mixed oligonucleotide primers targeted for conserved sequences of reported genes from other species was used to prepare a DNA probe to detect the gene. Colony hybridisation with this probe demonstrated that all the -positive strains produced urease. Considering the coincidence between production of urease and possession of in , it was concluded that the presence or absence of the gene is completely coincident with that of the gene in strains. Furthermore, the relative location of and on chromosomal DNA was analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The results showed that, in all the strains examined, and were detected on the same I fragment, showing that the two genes localise within a relatively small portion of the chromosome DNA. These results suggest that the and genes are genetically linked in strains.

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1997-08-01
2022-08-11
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