1887

Abstract

Specific pathogen-free Mongolian gerbils were infected orally with to establish a new small animal model of severe gastritis was recovered by culture from both antrum and body over a 16-week period after a single inoculation. The number of colonising the antrum was about 100-fold higher than in the body, and this was consistent throughout the experiment. Histological examination showed that all animals developed severe inflammation with infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and mononuclear cells into the lamina propria and submucosa of the antrum from 4 weeks after infection. From 8 weeks after infection, multifocal lymphoid follicles appeared in the lamina propria and submucosa, and micro-erosions were also observed in the epithelial layer. At 16 weeks after infection, ulceration with disruption of the lamina muscularis mucosae was observed in the antral mucosa. To determine whether caused gastritis or not, infected gerbils were treated with amoxycillin. After the treatment, gastritis could not be seen in the gastric mucosa. Therefore, the Mongolian gerbil is a useful small animal model to study the pathogenesis of in gastric ulceration and severe gastritis and to assess anti- treatment.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-46-5-391
1997-05-01
2024-05-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/46/5/medmicro-46-5-391.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-46-5-391&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Warren J. R., Marshall B. Unidentified curved bacilli on gastric epithelium in active chronic gastritis. Lancet 1983; 1:1273–1275
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Blaser M. J., Parsonnet J. Parasitism by the “slow” bacterium Helicobacter pylori leads to altered gastric homeostasis and neoplasia. J Clin Invest 1994; 94:4–8
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Graham D. Y. Campylobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease. Gastroenterology 1989; 96:615–625
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Tytgat G. N. J. Review article. Treatments that impact favourably upon the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and ulcer recurrence. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1994; 8:359–368
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Marshall B. J., Armstrong J. A., McGechie D. B., Glancy R. J. Attempt to fulfill Koch’s postulates for pyloric Campylobacter. Med J Aust 1985; 142:436–439
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Morris A., Nicholson G. Ingestion of Campylobacter pyloridis causes gastritis and raised fasting pH. Am J Gastroenterol 1987; 82:192–199
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Karita M., Kouchiyama T., Okita K., Nakazawa T. New small animal model for human gastric Helicobacter pylori infection: success in both nude and euthymic mice. Am J Gastroenterol 1991; 86:1596–1603
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Karita M., Li Q., Cantero D., Okita K. Establishment of a small animal model for human Helicobacter pylori infection using germ-free mouse. Am J Gastroenterol 1994; 89:208–213
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Krakowka S., Morgan D. R., Kraft W. G., Leunk R. D. Establishment of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet. Infect Immun 1987; 55:2789–2796
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Shuto R., Fujioka T., Kubota T., Nasu M. Experimental gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori in Japanese monkeys. Infect Immun 1993; 61:933–939
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Marchetti M., Arico B., Burroni D., Figura N., Rappuoli R., Ghiara P. Development of a mouse model of Helicobacter pylori infection that mimics human disease. Science 1995; 267:1655–1658
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Eaton K. A., Radin M. J., Krakowka S. Animal models of bacterial gastritis: the role of host, bacterial species and duration of infection on severity of gastritis. Zentralbl Bakteriol 1993; 280:28–37
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Fox J. G., Correa P., Taylor N. S. Helicobacter mustelae- associated gastritis in ferrets. An animal model of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in humans. Gastroenterology 1990; 99:352–361
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lee A., Fox J. G., Otto G., Murphy J. A small animal model of human Helicobacter pylori active chronic gastritis. Gastro-enterology 1990; 99:1315–1323
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lee A., Fox J., Hazell S. Pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori: a perspective. Infect Immun 1993; 61:1601–1610
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Sambrook J., Fritsch E. F., Maniatis T. Molecular cloning: a laboratory manual. 2nd edn New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; 1989
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Tummuru M. K., Cover T. L., Blaser M. J. Cloning and expression of a high-molecular-mass major antigen of Helicobacter pylori: evidence of linkage to cytotoxin production. Infect Immun 1993; 61:1799–1809
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Tee W., Lambert J. R., Dwyer B. Cytotoxin production by Helicobacter pylori from patients with upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. J Clin Microbiol 1995; 33:1203–1205
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Krakowka S., Eaton K. A., Rings D. M. Occurrence of gastric ulcers in gnotobiotic piglets colonized by Helicobacter pylori. Infect Immun 1995; 63:2352–2355
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Genta R. M., Hamner H. W. The significance of lymphoid follicles in the interpretation of gastric biopsy specimens. Arch Pathol Lab Med 1994; 118:740–743
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Bayerdörffer E., Lehn N., Hatz R. Difference in expression of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in antrum and body. Gastroenterology 1992; 102:1575–1582
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Satoh K., Kimura K., Yoshida Y., Kasano T., Kihira K., Taniguchi Y. A topographical relationship between Helicobacter pylori and gastritis: quantitative assessment of Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa. Am J Gastroenterol 1991; 86:285–291
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Fox J. G., Batchelder M., Marini R. et al. Helicobacter pylori- induced gastritis in the domestic cat. Infect Immun 1995; 63:2674–2681
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Matsumoto S., Washizuka Y., Matsumoto Y., Tawara S., Karita M. Metronidazole resistant mutant isolated from H. pylori infected euthymic mice model (abstract). Gut 1995; 37: Suppl 1A49
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Lee A., Chen M., Coltro N. Long term infection of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter species does induce atrophic gastritis in an animal model of Helicobacter pylori infection. Zentralbl Bakteriol 1993; 280:38–50
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Yokota K., Kurebayashi Y., Takayama Y. Colonization of Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils. Microbiol Immunol 1991; 35:475–480
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Hirayama F., Yokoyama Y., Iwao E., Takagi S., Ikeda Y. Establishment of gastric Helicobacter pylori infection model in the Mongolian gerbils. (abstract). First Meeting of the Japanese Research Society for Helicobacter pylori Related Gastroduodenal Diseases Tokyo: 199545
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Nawa Y., Horii Y., Okada M., Arizono N. Histochemical and cytological characterizations of mucosal and connective tissue mast cells of Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1994; 104:249–254
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Miller H. R. P., King S. J., Gibson S., Huntley J. F., Newlands G. F. J., Woodbury R. G. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and parasitized rats. In Befus A. D., Bienenstock J., Denburg J. A. (eds) Mast cell differentiation and heterogeneity New York: Raven Press; 1986239–255
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-46-5-391
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-46-5-391
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error