1887

Abstract

A model of persistent colonisation in the nasal cavity of mice by has been established. NNP-4 was introduced to the lungs of CBA/J mice at a density of 10 cfu/lung by an aerosol method and a high dose of ampicillin was administered 1 h after infection. This antibiotic eliminated bacteria from the lungs and trachea, but did not affect the bacterial counts in the nasal cavity. In mice given ampicillin, the bacteria were recovered from the nasal cavity only more than 2 weeks after infection, but IgG antibody against the colonising organisms was produced in sera around day 8 after infection. Airway obstruction was induced by intratracheal injection of formalin 2% into mice. Organisms appeared in the lungs in greater numbers when formalin was injected before the antibody production than when the immunity was established. In the early stages of infection, 10–10 cfu appeared in the lungs 6 h after the formalin injection and the bacterial counts increased to 10 cfu within 24 h. When ampicillin was administered again 1 h after formalin was given, no bacteria were recovered from lungs 6 h later. However, in some of the mice given ampicillin after formalin, bacteria appeared in the lungs on the next day and the bacterial counts increased thereafter. These results suggest that in the nasal cavity invade the lower respiratory tract and that these organisms can localise and proliferate in lungs in the event of damage to the airway.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-6-490
1996-06-01
2022-01-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/44/6/medmicro-44-6-490.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-6-490&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Berk S. L., Verghese A. Emerging pathogens in nosocomial pneumonia. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 1989; 8:11–14
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Gillespie S. H. Aspects of pneumococcal infection including bacterial virulence, host response and vaccination. J Med Microbiol 1989; 28:237–248
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Marrie T. J. Bacteraemia pneumococcal pneumonia: a continuously evolving disease. J Infect 1992; 24:247–255
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Vathanophas K., Sangchai R., Raktham S. A community based study of acute respiratory tract infection in Thai children. Rev Infect Dis 1990; 12: Suppl 8S957–S965
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Montgomery J. M., Lehmann D., Smith T. Bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract and its association with acute lower respiratory tract infections in Highland children of Papua New Guinea. Rev Infect Dis 1990; 12: Suppl 8S1006–S1016
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Paton J. C., Andrew P. W., Boulnois G. J., Mitchell T. J. Molecular analysis of the pathogenicity of Streptococcus pneumoniae: the role of pneumococcal proteins. Annu Rev Microbiol 1993; 47:89–115
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Smith T., Lehmann D., Montgomery J., Gratten M., Riley I. D., Alpers M. P. Acquisition and invasiveness of different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in young children. Epidemiol Infect 1993; 111:27–39
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Musher D. M. Infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae: clinical spectrum, pathogenesis, immunity, and treatment. Clin Infect Dis 1992; 14:801–809
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Boulnois G. J. Pneumococcal proteins and the pathogenesis of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. J Gen Microbiol 1992; 138:249–259
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Busse W. W. Pathogenesis and sequelae of respiratory infections. Rev Infect Dis 1991; 13: Suppl 6S477–S485
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Johnston R. B. Pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Rev Infect Dis 1991; 13: Suppl 6S509–S517
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Bruyn G. A. W., Zegers B. J. M., van Furth R. Mechanisms of host defense against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Clin Infect Dis 1992; 14:251–262
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Lindberg K., Freijd A., Rynnel-Dagoo B., Hammarstrom L. Anti-pneumococcal antibody acti vity in nasopharyngeal secretions in healthy adults and children. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 1993; 113:673–678
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Murphy T. F., Sethi S. Bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Am Rev Respir Dis 1992; 146:1067–1083
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Iizawa Y., Nishi T., Kondo M., Imada A. Experimental chronic pulmonary infection in mice caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Microbiol Immunol 1988; 32:895–906
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Andersson B., Dahmén J., Freijd T. Identification of an active disaccharide unit of a glycoconjugate receptor for pneumococci attaching to human pharyngeal epithelial cells. J Exp Med 1983; 158:559–570
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Cundell D. R., Tuomanen E. L. Receptor specificity of adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to human type-II pneumocytes and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. Microb Pathog 1994; 17:361–374
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Krivan H. C., Roberts D. D., Ginsburg V. Many pulmonary pathogenic bacteria bind specifically to the carbohydrate sequence GalNAcβl-4Gal found in some glycolipids. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988; 85:6157–6161
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Sundberg-Kovamees M., Holme T., Sjogren A. M. Specific binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae to two receptor saccharide structures. Microb Pathog 1994; 17:63–68
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Cundell D. R., Weiser J. N., Shen J., Young A., Tuomanen E. l. Relationship between colonial morphology and adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Infect Immun 1995; 63:757–761
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Andersson B., Beachey E. H., Tomasz A., Tuomanen E., Svanborg-Edén C. A sandwich adhesin on Streptococcus pneumoniae attaching to human oropharyngeal epithelial cells in vitro. Microb Pathog 1988; 4:267–278
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Geelen S., Bhattacharyya C., Tuomanen E. The cell wall mediates pneumococcal attachment to and cytopathology in human endothelial cells. Infect Immun 1993; 61:1538–1543
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-6-490
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-6-490
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error