1887

Abstract

Summary

is an emerging pathogen, especially in immunocompromised hosts. As the adherence of this organism both to host epithelial surfaces and to catheter and prosthetic surfaces appears to be important in the pathogenesis of superficial as well as systemic candidoses, the adhesion of 20 oral isolates of and five oral isolates of was compared with the following substrates: cultured (HeLa) epithelial cells, buccal epithelial cells (BEC) from healthy adults and bone marrow transplant patients, and acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) surfaces. Animal experiments in Sprague Dawley rats were also conducted to evaluate the relative oral carriage rate of the two spp. isolates adhered in far greater numbers to acrylic surfaces than to either of the cell surfaces. Significant intra-species differences in adhesion for acrylic surfaces were noted between 74 (39 %) of 190 pair comparisons in contrast to 18 (9.5 %) of 190 with HeLa surfaces (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the adhesion of isolates to HeLa cells and acrylic surfaces. Five isolates of showed very low adherence to HeLa surfaces when compared with BEC obtained from either healthy individuals or bone marrow transplant patients. The adherence of to BEC from the healthy individuals was 12-fold greater than that of , a figure similar to the relative murine oral carriage rate of the two spp. However, the adhesion of to BEC from bone marrow transplant patients was three-fold less than to BEC of healthy individuals whilst adhesion remained the same, reflecting a possible selective colonisation process which may operate in these patient groups, possibly as a result of drug therapy. The current data, while confirming the inter- and intra-species differences in adherence of spp. to host surfaces, illustrate that adherence-related factors may operate during colonisation of on mucosal, catheter and prosthetic surfaces, in both health and disease.

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1994-10-01
2024-04-23
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