1887

Abstract

Summary

The clinical importance of the gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) isolated in 1987 at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, is assessed. Of about 800 anaerobic isolates, 209 (27%) were GPAC, of which 67 (32%) were from abscesses and 22 (11 %) were in pure growth. Four species comprised 77% of the 168 isolates available for study: (55 isolates, 33 %), (23, 14%), (24, 14%) and (27, 16%). Different species were associated with different sites, from (usually skin-associated sites ; normally cultured with aerobes, infrequently with other anaerobes), (distributed widely) and (usually genitourinary and gastrointestinal ; always below the diaphragm) to (always deep sites with other anaerobes). was isolated from 15 abscesses and was obtained in pure culture from 11 specimens, six of them abscesses developing from infected sebaceous cysts. was usually isolated from soft tissue abscesses, never from the skin, and with a characteristic mixed flora consisting of “” and anaerobic gram-negative rods. was a rare isolate from similar specimens. was cultured from a wide variety of sites, typically mixed with both aerobes and anaerobes, and frequently from abscesses. Most isolates of came from gastrointestinal or female genitourinary specimens, never from above the diaphragm and rarely from the skin ; cultures were usually heavily mixed. Isolates of and the “bGAL” group made up 11 % of strains and were usually cultured from superficial sites, often from post-operative wound infections with There were only two isolates of three of and none of or GPAC are a heterogeneous group associated with a wide variety of infections, particularly abscesses, and are frequently isolated in pure culture. They deserve further study.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-41-1-36
1994-07-01
2022-08-14
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/41/1/medmicro-41-1-36.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-41-1-36&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Wren MWD, Baldwin AWF, Eldon CP, Sanderson PJ. The anaerobic culture of clinical specimens: a 14-month study. J Med Microbiol 1977; 10:49–61
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Holland JW, Hill EO, Altemeier WA. Numbers and types of anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens since 1960. J Clin Microbiol 1977; 5:20–25
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Rosenblatt JE. Anaerobic cocci. In: Lennette EH, Balows A, Hausier WJ, Shadomy HJ. Manual of clinical microbiology 4th edn Washington, USA: American Society for Microbiology; 1985445–449
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Brook I. Recovery of anaerobic bacteria from clinical specimens in 12 years at two military hospitals. J Clin Microbiol 1988; 26:1181–1188
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Finegold SM, George WL. Anaerobic infections in humans. New York: Academic Press; 1989
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Ezaki T, Yamamoto N, Ninomiya K, Suzuki S, Yabuuchi E. Transfer of Peptococcus indolicus, Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, Peptococcus prevotii and Peptococcus magnus to the genus Peptostreptococcus and proposal of Peptostreptococcus tetradius sp. nov. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1983; 33:683–698
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Huss VAR, Festl H, Schleifer KH. Nucleic acid hybridization studies and deoxyribonucleic acid base compositions of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1984; 34:95–101
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Holdeman Moore LV, Johnson JL, Moore WEC. Genus Peptococcus Kluyver and van Niel 1936, 400AL. In: Sneath PHA. Bergey’s manual of systematic bacteriology 2 Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 19861082–1092
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Taylor EA, Jackman PJH, Phillips I. The differentiation of asaccharolytic anaerobic gram-positive cocci by protein electrophoresis. J Med Microbiol 1991; 34:339–348
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ezaki T, Oyaizu H, Yabuuchi E. The anaerobic gram-positive cocci. In: Balows A. et al. The prokaryotes, 2nd edn. New York: Springer-Verlag; 19921879–1892
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Holdeman LV, Cato EP, Moore WEC. Anaerobe laboratory manual. , 4th edn. Blacksburg: Anaerobe Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; 1977
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Sutter VL, Citron DM, Edelstein MAC. et al. Wadsworth anaerobic bacteriology manual. , 4th edn. Los Angeles: Star Publishing Co; 1985
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hillier S, Moncla BJ. Anaerobic gram-positive nonspore-forming bacilli and cocci. In: Balows A, Hausier WJ, Herrmann KL, Isenberg HD, Shadomy EP. Manual of clinical microbiology, 5th edn. Washington: American Society for Microbiology; 1991532–535
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Ezaki T, Yabuuchi E. Oligopeptidase activity of gram-positive anaerobic cocci used for rapid identification. J Gen Appl Microbiol 1985; 31:255–265
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Schiefer-Ullrich H, Andreesen JR. Peptostreptococcus barnesae sp. nov., a gram-positive, anaerobic, obligately purine-utilising coccus from chicken faeces. Arch Microbiol 1985; 143:26–31
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Ezaki T, Liu S-L, Hashimoto Y, Yabuuchi E. Peptostreptococcus hydrogenalis sp. nov. from human faecal and vaginal flora. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1990; 40:305–306
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Li N, Hashimoto Y, Adnan S, Miura H, Yamamoto H, Ezaki T. Three new species of the genus Peptostreptococcus isolated from humans: Peptostreptococcus vaginalis sp. nov., Peptostreptococcus lacrimalis sp. nov., and Peptostreptococcus lactolyticus sp. nov. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1992; 42:602–605
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Stenson MJ, Lee DT, Rosenblatt JE, Contezac JM. Evaluation of the Anldent system for the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 1986; 5:9–15
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Murdoch DA, Mitchelmore IJ, Tabaqchali S. Identification of gram-positive anaerobic cocci by use of systems for detecting pre-formed enzymes. J Med Microbiol 1988; 25:289–293
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Murdoch DA, Mitchelmore IJ, Nash RA, Hardie JM, Tabaqchali S. Preformed enzyme profiles of reference strains of gram-positive anaerobic cocci. J Med Microbiol 1988; 27:65–70
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Murdoch DA, Mitchelmore IJ. The laboratory identification of gram-positive anaerobic cocci. J Med Microbiol 1991; 34:295–308
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Madsen M, Hoi-Sorensen G, Aalbaek B, Hansen JW, Bjorn H. Summer mastitis in heifers: studies of the seasonal occurrence of Actinomyces pyogenes, Peptostreptococcus indolicus and Bacteroidaceae in clinically healthy cattle in Denmark. Vet Microbiol 1992; 30:243–255
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Madsen M, Aalbaek B, Hansen JW. Comparative bacteriological studies on summer mastitis in grazing cattle and pyogenes mastitis in stabled cattle in Denmark. Vet Microbiol 1992; 32:81–88
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Hare R. The anaerobic cocci. In: Waterson AP. Recent advances in medical microbiology London: Churchill; 1967284–317
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Hardie JM. Anaerobic streptococci. In: Sneath PHA. Bergey’s manual of systematic bacteriology 2 Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 19861066–1068
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Collins MD, Wallbanks S. Comparative sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacillus minutus, Lactobacillus rimae and Streptococcus parvulus: proposal for the creation of a new genus Atopobium. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1992; 74:235–240
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Bartlett JG. Anaerobic cocci. In: Mandell GL, Douglas RG, Bennett JE. Principles and practice of infectious diseases, 3rd edn. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 19901867–1869
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Bourgault A-M, Rosenblatt JE, Fitzgerald RH. Peptococcus magnus: a significant human pathogen. Ann Int Med 1980; 93:244–248
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Fitzgerald RH, Rosenblatt JE, Tenney JH, Bourgault AM. Anaerobic septic arthritis. Clin Orthop 1982; 164:141–148
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Schottmueller H. Zur bedeutung einiger anaeroben in der pathologie, insbesondere bie pueperalen erkrangungen. Mitt Grenzgeb Med Chir 1910; 21:450–490
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Schwarz D, Dieckman WJ. Anaerobic Streptococci : their role in puerperal infection. South Med J 1926; 19:470–479
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Hare R, Polunin I. Anaerobic cocci in the vagina of native women in British North Borneo. J Obs Gvn Br Emp 1960; 67:985–989
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Sanderson PJ. Infection of the foot with Peptococcus magnus. J Clin Pathol 1977; 30:266–268
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Wheat LJ, Allen SD, Henry M et al. Diabetic foot infections Bacteriologic analysis. Arch Int Med 1986; 146:1935–1940
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Hunter T, Chow AW. Peptostreptococcus magnus septic arthritis—a report and review of the English literature. J Rheumatol 1988; 15:1583–1584
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Davies UM, Leak AM, Dave J. Infection of a prosthetic knee joint with Peptostreptococcus magnus. Ann Rheum Dis 1988; 47:866–868
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Cofsky RD, Seligman SJ. Peptococcus magnus endocarditis. South Med J 1985; 78:361–362
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Pouedras P, Donnio PY, Sire JM, Avril JL. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and paravalvular abscess caused by Peptostreptococcus magnus. Clin Infect Dis 1992; 15:185
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Phelps R, Jacobs RA. Purulent pericarditis and mediastinitis due to Peptococcus magnus. JAMA 1985; 254:947–948
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Panagou P, Papandreou L, Bouros D. Severe anaerobic necrotizing pneumonia complicated by pyopneumothorax and anaerobic monoarthritis due to Peptostreptococcus magnus. Respiration 1991; 58:223–225
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Edmiston CE, Walker AP, Krepel CJ, Gohr C. The nonpuerperal breast infection : aerobic and anaerobic microbial recovery from acute and chronic disease. J Infect Dis 1990; 162:695–699
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Papasian CJ, McGregor DH, Hodges GR, Kennedy J. Peptostreptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis. J Clin Microbiol 1986; 24:633–635
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Topiel MS, Simon GL. Peptococcaceae bacteraemia. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 1986; 4:109–117
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Williams BL, McCann GF, Schoenknecht FD. Bacteriology of dental abscesses of endodontic origin. J Clin Microbiol 1983; 18:770–774
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Rams TE, Feik D, Listgarten MA, Slots J. Peptostreptococcus micros in human periodontitis. Oral Microbiol Immunol 1992; 7:1–6
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Murdoch DA, Mitchelmore IJ. Isolation of Peptostreptococcus heliotrinreducens from human polymicrobial abscesses. Lett Appl Microbiol 1989; 9:223–225
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Murdoch DA, Mitchelmore IJ, Tabaqchali S. Peptostreptococcus micros in polymicrobial abscesses. Lancet 1988; 1:594
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Brook I, Walker RI. The role of encapsulation in the pathogenesis of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. Can J Microbiol 1985; 31:176–180
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Brook I. Bacteriology of intracranial abscess in children. J Neurosurg 1981; 54:484–488
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Jokipii AMM, Jokipii L, Sipila P, Jokinen K. Semiquantitative culture results and pathogenic significance of obligate anaerobes in peritonsillar abscesses. J Clin Microbiol 1988; 26:957–961
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Harpold DJ, Wasilauskas BL. Rapid identification of obligately anaerobic gram-positive cocci using high-pressure liquid chromatography. J Clin Microbiol 1987; 25:996–1001
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Murdoch DA, Wilks M, Mitchelmore IJ, Tabaqchali S. Identification of gram-positive anaerobic cocci by gasliquid chromatography and preformed enzyme profile using a commercial kit, ATB 32A. In: Borriello SP. et al. Clinical and molecular aspects of anaerobes Peters-field: Wrightson Biomedical; 1990285–291
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Brook I. Microbiology of postthoracotomy sternal wound infection. J Clin Microbiol 1989; 27:806–807
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Neut C, Lesieur V, Romond C, Beerens H. Analysis of grampositive anaerobic cocci in oral, faecal and vaginal flora. Eur J Clin Microbiol 1985; 4:435–437
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Krepel CJ, Gohr CM, Edmiston CE, Farmer SG. Anaerobic pathogenesis: collagenase production by Peptostreptococcus magnus and its relationship to site of infection. J Infect Dis 1991; 163:1148–1150
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Krepel CJ, Gohr CM, Walker AP, Farmer SG, Edmiston CE. Enzymatically active Peptostreptococcus magnus : association with site of infection. J Clin Microbiol 1992; 30:2330–2334
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-41-1-36
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-41-1-36
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error