1887

Abstract

Summary

Variant colony formation by has been described and the phenomenon of phenotypic switching has been studied extensively. Whereas the micro-structure of non-variant colonies has been investigated by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM), the relationship between switched variant colonies and microstructure has not been described. The object of this study was to investigate and compare by SEM the microstructure of the normal colony type and five common variant colony types of and to determine whether a pattern of dimorphic growth could account for the characteristic colony morphologies. A general relationship between colony type and structure was observed ; smooth colonies consisted entirely of blastospores whereas regular, irregular-wrinkled and semi-rough colonies consisted of different proportions of true hyphae and blastospores. Regular extreme-jagged shaped colonies consisted of an almost pure culture of pseudo-hyphae, and colonies producing aerial hyphae were composed of pseudo- and true hyphae, as well as blastospores. These results show a clear relationship between colony morphology and development of particular cell types.

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1994-06-01
2023-01-29
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