1887

Abstract

Summary

A collection of 13 strains of including both clinical and environmental isolates from different geographic regions, was examined for various toxins. One strain of environmental origin produced cholera-like toxin (CT) which was completely absorbed with anti-CT immunoglobulin G, five strains produced a haemolysin that cross-reacted with the thermostable direct haemolysin of and DNA from two strains hybridised with a DNA probe specific for the heat-stable enterotoxin of non-O1. Culture supernates of all strains produced a factor that was cytotoxic to Vero and Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this study, we were able to identify strains of that produced, or had the genetic potential to produce, several toxin types simultaneously. The role of these strains as genetic reservoirs is discussed.

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1994-03-01
2022-10-01
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