1887

Abstract

Summary

Heat shock proteins (HSP) are thought to play a role in the aetiology of autoimmune diseases, but are also common targets for the immune response to many infections. Patients recovering from systemic candidosis produce antibodies to HSP 90, both to species-specific epitopes and, more commonly, to epitopes shared with human HSP 90. One such autoreactive antibody was protective in a mouse model of systemic candidosis.

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1992-06-01
2022-09-25
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