1887

Abstract

Summary

Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 3D9 with reported specificity for hyphae, and 3B7 with reported specificity for morphological forms of found , were tested by indirect immunofluorescence with cells that were grown in 12 different environments (four different culture media incubated at various temperatures) and whose cellular morphology was estimated in terms of morphology index (Mi). Both MAbs reacted strongly with cells with Mi> 3.0, i.e., with pseudohyphal and hyphal forms, but in Eagle’s medium at 26°C and in a modified Sabouraud’s broth medium at 30°C, some reactivity was also found with cells of lower Mi (i.e., yeast forms). Therefore, it was concluded that the hyphal phenotype and the epitopes reactive with the MAbs were co-expressed but that the epitopes could also be expressed independently of the hyphal phenotype. The results confirm the propensity of for variation of its surface antigenic composition.

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1991-12-01
2024-04-15
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