1887

Abstract

Summary

Human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) underwent several changes in response to challenge with , namely (1) an increase in oxygen uptake, (2) changes in membrane electrical properties, and (3) increased transport of chloride ions (C1) across the membrane. Mean oxygen consumption and C1 uptake by PMNL were stimulated by both pilate (P) and non-pilate (P) gonococci, although the levels were much reduced in the presence of P organisms. P gonococci also initiated low levels of polarisation or depolarisation in contrast with P cells, which caused hyperpolarisation followed by depolarisation in the PMNL. Most of the strains showed these patterns. High performance liquid chromatography of extracts of unstimulated PMNL and of PMNL challenged with gonococci confirmed production of hypochlorous acid (HOC1) in the leucocyte. Furthermore, addition of radiolabelled C1 to the PMNLs showed that some of the C1 taken up by the cells in response to gonococcal challenge was incorporated into the HOC1, suggesting a direct relationship between stimulation of C1 uptake and production of active chlorine compounds in the leucocyte.

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1991-05-01
2022-01-17
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