1887

Abstract

Surmmary

Five strains of enterobacteria (three of and two of ) were studied to assess and compare their phagocytic uptake and intracellular killing by mouse macrophages. Each strain was injected intraperitoneally into separate groups of mice and peritoneal exudate cells were harvested after 3 min for phagocytosis to occur . Acridine orange staining showed that there were approximately 10-fold fewer intracellular than . The average numbers of viable intracellular bacteria per leucocyte were 0.03 and 0.02 for strains M13 and H1, respectively, and 0.48, 0.45, and 0.28 for strains M14, A-D M5 and H40. Thus, both strains were ingested less readily than any of the three strains (p<0.01). The rates of in-vitro intracellular killing were similar for all five strains of bacteria. The intracellular killing constants (K) for the three mouse isolates were 0.017, 0.016 and 0.020 min for M14 and A-D M5, and M13, respectively; the Ks for the two human isolates were 0.026 and 0.029/min for H40 and H1, respectively. The Ks for all five strains were not significantly different. Assuming that the numbers of viable intracellular bacteria at the beginning of the assay represented 100% viability, 6-17% of the intracellular bacteria remained viable after 2 h, reflecting log 3.9–5.6 bacteria (6–8) × 10 peritoneal exudate cells. Intravenous injection of these five strains into separate groups of mice demonstrated that the strains were more virulent than the strains. Injection of each strain was associated with ruffled fur and death, whereas mice given any of the three strains remained visibly healthy and none died. Consistent with these observations, quantitation of viable bacteria in the liver and spleen showed that greater numbers of M13 than of M14 or A-D M5 persisted in these organs; similarly greater numbers of H1 than of H40 persisted in the liver and spleen. Because the rates of intracellular killing of these five strains were similar, the relative virulence of both strains of appeared to be associated with decreased phagocytic uptake rather than differences in intracellular survival.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-33-3-153
1990-11-01
2022-08-17
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/33/3/medmicro-33-3-153.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-33-3-153&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Leijh P C J, van Furth R, van Zwet T L. In-vitro determination of phagocytosis and intracellular killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes. In Weir D M. (ed) Handbook of experimental immunology. , 4th edn. vol. 2 chapter 46: Cellular immunology Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1986
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Moulder J W. Comparative biology of intracellular parasitism. Microbiol Rev 1985; 49:298–337
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Wells C L, Maddaus M A, Simmons R L. Proposed mechanisms for the translocation of intestinal bacteria. Rev Infect Dis 1988; 10:958–979
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Racz P, Tenner K, Mero E. Experimental listeria enteritis. I. An electron microscopic study of the epithelial phase in experimental listeria infection. Lab Invest 1972; 6:694–700
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Popiel I, Turnbull P C. Passage of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella thompson through chick ileocecal mucosa. Infect Immun 1985; 47:786–792
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Wells C L, Maddaus M A, Erlandsen S L, Simmons R L. Evidence for the phagocytic transport of intestinal particles in dogs and rats. Infect Immun 1988; 56:278–282
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Finegold S M, Baron E J. Bailey and Scott’s diagnostic microbiology. St Louis, MO: The CV Mosby Co; 1986914
    [Google Scholar]
  8. van Dissel J T, Leijh P C J, van Furth R. Differences in initial rate of intracellular killing of Salmonella typhi-murium by resident peritoneal macrophages from various mouse strains. J Immunol 1985; 134:3404–3410
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ofek I, Sharon N. Lectinophagocytosis: a molecular mechanism of recognition between cell surface sugars and lectins in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Infect Immun 1988; 56:539–547
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Pantazis C G, Kniker W T. Assessment of blood leukocyte microbial killing by using a new fluorochrome microassay. J Reticuloendothel Soc 1979; 26:155–169
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Berg R D, Savage D C. Immune responses of specific pathogen-free and gnotobiotic mice to antigens of indigenous and non-indigenous microorganisms. Infect Immun 1975; 11:320–329
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Bjorksten B, Wadstrom T. Interaction of Escherichia coli with different fimbriae and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infect Immun 1982; 38:298–305
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Silverblatt F J, Ofek I. Influence of pili on the virulence of Proteus mirabilis in experimental pyelonephritis. In Kass E, Brumfitt W. (eds) Infections of the urinary tract. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Pyelonephritis London. Chicago: Chicago University Press; 197949–59
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Silverblatt F J, Ofek I. Influence of pili on the virulence of Proteus mirabilis in experimental hematogenous pyelonephritis. J Infect Dis 1978; 138:664–667
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Silverblatt F J, Dreyer J S, Schauer S. Effect of pili on susceptibility of Escherichia coli to phagocytosis. Infect Immun 1979; 24:218–223
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Mandell G L. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. In vitro and in vivo studies with emphasis on staphylococcal-leukocyte interactions. J Clin Invest 1975; 55:561–566
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Rogers D E, Tompsett R. The survival of staphylococci within human leukocytes. J Exp Med 1952; 95:209–230
    [Google Scholar]
  18. VerbrughH A. Phagocytosis and destruction of Staphylococ cus aureus . Vet Q 1981; 3:91–97
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Slijivic V S, Warr G W. Measurement of phagocytic function in vivo . In Herscowit H B, Holden H T, Bellanti J A, Ghaffar A. (eds) Manual of macrophage methodology. Collection, characterization, and function New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc; 1981447–457
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Czuprynski C J, Hensen P M, Campbell P A. Killing of Listeria monocytogenes by inflammatory neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes from immune and nonimmune mice. J Leukoc Biol 1984; 35:193–208
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Densen P, Mandell G L. Phagocyte strategy vs. microbial tactics. Rev Infect Dis 1980; 2:817
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Mandell T E, Cheers C. Resistance and susceptibility of mice to bacterial infection: histopathology of listeriosis in resistant and susceptible strains. Infect Immun 1980; 30:851–861
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Harmsen A G, Muggenburg B A, Snipes M B, Bice D E. The role of macrophages in particle translocation from lungs to lymph nodes. Science 1985; 230:1277–1280
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Maejima K, Deitch E A, Berg R D. Bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tracts of rats receiving thermal injury. Infect Immun 1984; 43:6–10
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Steffen E, Berg R D. Relationship between cecal population levels of indigenous bacteria and translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes. Infect Immun 1983; 39:1252–1259
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wells C L, Maddaus M A, Reynolds C M, Jechorek R P, Simmons R L. The role of the anaerobic flora in the translocation of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic intestinal bacteria. Infect Immun 1987; 55:2689–2694
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Wells C L, Jechorek R P, Maddaus M A. The translocation of intestinal facultative and anaerobic bacteria in defined flora mice. Microb Ecol Health Dis 1988; 1:227–235
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Wells C L, Jechorek R P, Maddaus M A, Simmons R L. The effects of clindamycin and metronidazole on the intestinal colonization and translocation of enterococci in mice. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1988; 32:1769–1775
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-33-3-153
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-33-3-153
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error