1887

Abstract

produces several potential virulence factors. One of these is an adenylate cyclase which penetrates eukaryotic cells, is activated by calmodulin and generates high levels of intracellular cAMP. We have found that pertussis infection in man leads to production of high titres (2000-8000) of anti- adenylate cyclase antibodies. Such antibodies also are produced after pertussis vaccination. They persist into adulthood, cross the placenta and disappear a few months after birth. The anti-adenylate cyclase antibodies found in human serum during pertussis infection do not neutralise the catalytic and penetrative activities of the enzyme.

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1990-07-01
2022-01-17
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