1887

Abstract

. In a longitudinal bacteriological study of the cultivable subgingival anaerobic flora isolated from developing broken mouth periodontitis in sheep, samples were taken from five sheep on each of three farms on seven occasions over a period of 2.5 years. Ten different bacterial genera were isolated regularly but with fluctuating frequencies. and organisms accounted for nearly 70% of the isolates. The and isolates studied in detail from one farm were identified to species level. The fusobacteria comprised F. -like organisms (68.6%). (29.6%) and (1.8%). The spp. were divided into 11 main groups and included black-pigmented species similar to and . On the farm studied in detail, the sheep could be allocated to two groups according to progression of periodontal disease. Most of the -like isolates were from sheep with actively progressing disease, indicating that this organism may play a role in periodontal destruction in sheep.

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1990-04-01
2023-02-05
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