1887

Abstract

Summary

The haemagglutinins and fimbriae produced by 18 strains of were studied and compared with those formed by representative strains of other species of Proteeae. After repeated subcultures at 30°C, 12 strains formed only MR/K haemagglutinins which were associated with thin, non-channelled, type-3 fimbriae. Two strains formed simultaneously both MS and MR/K haemagglutinins associated with thick, channelled, type-1 fimbriae and type-3 fimbriae, respectively. Four strains formed simultaneously both MR/K and MR/P haemagglutinins. No strain formed either MS or MR/P haemagglutinins alone under these conditions. The type-3 fimbriae from strain E180 were isolated, purified and found to be protein of 19 Kda. Immunoelectronmicroscopy studies with antibody to the type-3 fimbriae of strain E180 showed that strains formed at least two antigenic types of type-3 fimbriae. The type-3 fimbrial antigen of the vaccine strain E180 was shared by another eight strains of A further eight strains and the strains representative of other genera within Proteeae had type-3 fimbriae of a different antigenic type. The formation of these haemagglutinins and fimbriae suggests that this organism is well endowed to be a urinary-tract pathogen.

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1989-12-01
2022-01-26
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