1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Desalted ammonium-sulphate (0–65%) precipitates from the cell-free supernates of 16–24-h cultures of Boldy and (previously ) Type 5 were eluted through Sephadex G-200. The enzyme activities gave rise to two main peaks. The first peak (approximate mol. wt of protein 150 000) contained only phosphatase activity (assayed by hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate at pH 5.0 and 7.0). The second peak (approximate mol. wts of proteins 40 000–60 000) contained the haemolysin activity and the following hydrolytic activities (assay substrates are given in parentheses): phospholipase C (phosphatidyl choline and 4-nitrophenyl-phosphoryl-choline); phosphodiesterase (-4-nitrophenyl-phosphate); acid phosphatase (4-nitrophenylphosphatase); and esterases and lipases (4-nitrophenyl acetate, naphthyl-acetate and -oleate, triacetin and triolein). DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of appropriate fractions from the Sephadex G-200 purification step separated the first peak into two phosphatases and resolved the second peak into its constituent activities. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the individual fractions from the DEAE-Sephadex step consisted of mixtures of protein. The effects of pH and potential activators and inhibitors on the active proteins purified by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography were examined.

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1989-10-01
2022-01-25
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