1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

In a prospective study, 52 isolates from individual patients with septicaemia and 27 nasal strains from separate, healthy carriers were compared for production of a range of extracellular proteins and toxins. Whereas there was no difference (p > 0.05) between septicaemic and nasal isolates with respect to incidence of α, β, γ and haemolysins, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 or staphylokinase production, the incidence of enterotoxin A, B, and C production was higher among isolates from septicaemia (p < 0.01). Of the isolates from septicaemia, 33 (63%) produced enterotoxins A, B, C or D alone or in combination. Only three (11%) of the nasal isolates produced a single enterotoxin, enterotoxin D. Of the isolates from septicaemia, 67% were hospital-acquired and > 25% of these were endemic, methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains. All MRSA strains produced either enterotoxin A, or enterotoxin B, or both. These findings suggest a possible role for enterotoxins in the pathogenesis of disease other than food poisoning.

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1989-03-01
2022-01-29
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