1887

Abstract

Summary

Mice (strain TO) were inoculated with a human strain of (serovar E) either 14 days before the detection of a vaginal plug (day 1 of pregnancy), or from one to nine days thereafter. The organisms were given via the intraperitoneal route (ip) or intravenously with an additional intravaginal inoculum (iv + ivag). Mice were killed on day 18 of pregnancy and the contents of the uterus examined. Chlamydiae were isolated from at least one placental disk of about a quarter of the mice. Organisms given via the ip route established placental colonisation more effectively. Thus, placental colonisation was detected in five of 16 mice given chlamydiae by the ip route (in six of eight placentas in one mouse), whereas colonisation occurred in only a single placenta from one of nine mice infected via the iv + ivag routes. Chlamydiae were isolated from 13 (6·25%) of 208 placentas examined; the degree of colonisation was variable and the individual placentas were colonised independently. Chlamydiae were not recovered from fetal tissue, even when there was heavy placental colonisation. Nor were they isolated from maternal spleens, even though there was antibody to . in all maternal sera; the titres were in the range 4–2048, depending on the time of chlamydial challenge. These experiments show that . did not cross the placenta and that the pregnancy outcome in these mice was not affected.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-25-1-1
1988-01-01
2022-05-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/25/1/medmicro-25-1-1.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-25-1-1&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bosseray N. 1980; Colonization of mouse placentas by Brucella abortus inoculated during pregnancy. British Journal of Experimental Pathology 61:361–368
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Buzoni-Gatel D, Rodolakis A. 1983; A mouse model to compare virulence of abortive and intestinal ovine strains of Chlamydia psittaci: influence of the route of inoculation. Annales de Microbiologie (Institut Pasteur) 134A:91–99
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Gale J L, Tuffrey M, Falder P, Taylor-Robinson D. 1986; Fetal outcomes in mice infected with Chlamydia trachomatis . Oriel D. Chlamydial Infections. Cambridge University Press;384–387
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Harrison H R, Alexander E R, Weinstein L, Lewis M, Nash M, Sim D A. 1983; Cervical Chlamydia trachomatis and mycoplasmal infections in pregnancy: epidemiology and outcomes. Journal of the American Medical Association 250:1721–1727
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Heggie A D, Lumicao G G, Stuart L A, Gyves M T. 1981; Chlamydia trachomatis infection in mothers and infants. American Journal of Diseases of Children 135:507–511
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kunimoto D, Brunham R C. 1985; Human immune response and Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 7:665–673
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kuo C-C. 1978; Cultures of Chlamydia trachomatis in mouse peritoneal macrophages: factors affecting organism growth. Infection and Immunity 20:439–445
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Manor E, Sarov I. 1986; Fate of Chlamydia trachomatis in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Infection and Immunity 54:90–95
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Martin D H. 1982; Prematurity and perinatal mortality in pregnancies complicated by maternal Chlamydia trachomatis infections. Journal of the American Medical Association 247:1585–1588
    [Google Scholar]
  10. McLaren A, Michie D. 1959; Superpregnancy in the mouse. 1. Implantation arid foetal mortality after induced superovu-lation in females of various ages. Journal of Experimental Biology 36:281–300
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Munday P E. 1984; Spontaneous abortion—an infectious aetiology?. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 91:1177–1180
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Rodolakis A. 1983; In vitro and in vivo properties of chemically induced temperature-sensitive mutants of Chlamydia psittaci var. ovis: screening in a murine model. Infection and Immunity 42:525–530
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Rothermel C D. 1985; Chlamydia and human monocytes; relationship between parasite growth and host cell differentiation. Abstractsof the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Microbiology. 30
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Schachter J. 1967; Isolation of Bedsoniae from human arthritis and abortion tissues. American Journal of Ophthalmology 63: Suppl: 1082-1086
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Storz J. 1971; Chlamydia and chlamydia induced diseases. Charles C Thomas; Springfield, Illinois:
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Thomas B J, Evans R T, Hutchinson G R, Taylor-Robinson D. 1977; Early detection of chlamydial inclusions combining the use of cycloheximide-treated McCoy cells and imrau-nofluorescence staining. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 6:285–292
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Thomas B J, Reeve P, Oriel J D. 1976; Simple serological test for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis . Journal, of Clinical Microbiology 4:6–10
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Tuffrey M, Falder P, Gale J, Taylor-Robinson D. 1986; Salpingitis in mice induced by human strains of Chlamydia trachomatis . British Journal of Experimental Pathology 67:605–616
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Tuffrey M, Falder P, Thomas B, Taylor-Robinson D. 1984; The distribution and effect of Chlamydia trachomatis in CBA mice inoculated genitally, intra-articularly or intravenously. Medical Microbiology and Immunology 173:29–35
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Tuffrey M, Taylor-Robinson D. 1981; Progesterone as a key factor in the development of a mouse model for genital-tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis . FEMS Microbiology Letters 12:111–115
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Wong S Y, Gray E S, Buxton D, Finlayson J, Johnson F W A. 1985; Acute placentitis and spontaneous abortion caused by Chlamydia psittaci of sheep origin: a histological and ultrastructural study. Journal of Clinical Pathology 38:707–711
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-25-1-1
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-25-1-1
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error