1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The ability to form gas in lactose bile-salt broth at 44.5°C (the “faecal coliform” or FC test), growth in nutrient broth at 10°C, indole production and pectin liquefaction were studied in 480 strains of isolated from human and animal infections, from various sites in the hospital environment and hospital food, and from river water and flowers. A positive FC response was correlated inversely with the ability to grow at 10°C. Most strains of human and animal clinical origin were FC positive, whereas strains from water and flowers were mainly FC negative. The frequency of a positive FC response in strains from the hospital environment fell between these two extremes. The production of indole and liquefaction of pectin by klebsiellas was correlated directly with the ability to grow at 10°C and a negative FC response. Nearly all of the strains could be allocated to one of four groups on the basis of these tests.

The capsular serotype, bacteriocine-inhibition patterns and antibiotic sensitivities of the strains were examined. No correlation was evident between the first two properties and klebsiellas from any particular source. Strains of clinical origin were more often resistant to five or more antibiotics than were strains from the hospital environment, which in turn showed a greater frequency of antibiotic resistance than did strains from river water and flowers.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-13-4-541
1980-11-01
2022-05-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/13/4/medmicro-13-4-541.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-13-4-541&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. American Public Health Association 1976 Standard methods for the examination of water and wastewater 14th ed APHA: Washington;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Braman S. K., Eberhart R. J., Asbury M. A., Hermann G. J. 1973; Capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with bovine mastitis. J. Am. vet. med. Ass 162:109
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brown C., Seidler R. J. 1973; Potential pathogens in the environment: Klebsiella pneumoniae, a taxonomic and ecological enigma. Appl. Microbiol 25:900
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cooke E. M., Brayson J. C., Edmondson A. S., Hall D. 1979a; An investigation into the incidence and sources of klebsiella infections in hospital patients. J. Hyg., Camb 82:473
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Cooke E. M., Pool R., Brayson J. C., Edmondson A. S., Munro M. E., Shinebaum R. 1979b; Further studies on the sources of Klebsiella aerogenes infections in hospital patients. J. Hyg., Camb 83:391
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cooke E. M., Sazegar T., Edmondson A. S., Brayson J. C., Hall D. 1980; Klebsiella species in hospital food and kitchens: a source of organisms in the bowel of patients. J. Hyg., Camb 84:97
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Cowan S. T. 1974 Cowan and Steel’s manual for the identification of medical bacteria 2nd ed Cambridge University Press; Cambridge:
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Curie K., Speller D. C. E., Simpson R. A., Stephens M., Cooke D. I. 1978; A hospital epidemic caused by a gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella aerogenes. J. Hyg., Camb 80:115
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Donovan T. J. 1966; A Klebsiella screening medium. J. med. Lab. Technol 23:194
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Dufour A. P., Cabelli V. J. 1976; Characteristics of Klebsiella from textile finishing plant effluents. J. Wat. Pollut. Control Fed 48:872
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Duncan D. W., Razzell W. E. 1972; Klebsiella biotypes among coliforms isolated from forest environments and farm produce. Appl. Microbiol 24:933
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Edmondson A. S., Cooke E. M. 1979; The development and assessment of a bacteriocin typing method for Klebsiella. J. Hyg., Camb 82:207
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Edwards P. R., Ewing W. H. 1972 Identification of Enterobacteriaceae 3rd ed Burgess: Minneapolis; p 351
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Klein D., Spindler J. A., Matsen J. M. 1975; Relationship of indole production and antibiotic susceptibility in the Klebsiella bacillus. J. clin. Microbiol 2:425
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Knittel M. D. 1975; Occurrence of Klebsiella pneumoniae in surface waters. Appl. Microbiol 29:595
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Knittel M. D., Seidler R. J., Eby C., Cabe L. M. 1977; Colonisation of the botanical environment by Klebsiella isolates of pathogenic origin. Appl. envir. Microbiol 34:557
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Lautrop H. 1956; Gelatin-liquefying Klebsiella strains (Bacterium oxytocum (Fliigge)). Acta path, microbiol. scand 39:375
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Naemura L. G., Seidler R. J. 1978; Significance of low-temperature growth associated with the fecal coliform response, indole production, and pectin liquefaction in Klebsiella. Appl. envir. Microbiol 35:392
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Price D. J. E., Sleigh J. D. 1970; Control of infection due to Klebsiella aerogenes in a neurosurgical unit by withdrawal of all antibiotics. Lancet 2:1213
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Riesen V. L. von. 1976; Pectinolytic, indole-positive strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Int. J. syst. Bad 26:143
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Seidler R. J., Knittel M. D., Brown C. 1975; Potential pathogens in the environment: cultural reactions and nucleic acid studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae from clinical and environmental sources. Appl. Microbiol 29:819
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Stenzel W., Burger H., Mannheim W. 1972; On the systematics and differential diagnosis of the Klebsiella group under special consideration of the so-called oxytocum types. Zentbl. Bakt. ParasitKde I. Abt. Orig 219:193 (in German)
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Stokes E. J. 1975 Clinical bacteriology 4th ed Arnold; London:
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-13-4-541
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-13-4-541
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error