1887

Abstract

A total of 287 isolates belonging to DNA groups 2 () and 13TU was collected consecutively from 46 hospitals and typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting with primers DAF-4 and ERIC-2. With a similarity coefficient of ≥72% as a cut-off value, 37 clusters of genotypically similar isolates (genotypes) were recognised. Four major clusters, found in 15, 12, 12 and 8 hospitals respectively, accounted for 42% of isolates, but only three of these predominant clusters were associated with outbreaks of infection in individual hospitals. Many of the isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, including expanded-spectrum β-lactam agents, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones, but >98% remained susceptible to carbapenems and colistin. Overall, the study demonstrated that a heterogeneous population of DNA group 2 and 13TU isolates, frequently showing multiple resistance to antibiotics, was causing infections in UK hospitals, and that four predominant genotypes appeared to have disseminated among geographically distinct locations.

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2002-12-01
2019-11-19
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