1887

Abstract

Isolates of two distinct begomovirus species, the severe strain of the species (tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus-[India:New Delhi:Severe:1992]; ToLCNDV-[IN:ND:Svr:92], bipartite) and the Varanasi strain of the species (tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus-[India:Varanasi:2001]; ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01], mono/bipartite) infect tomato () and cause severe yield losses in northern India. This study investigated the infectivity properties of genomic components of these two species. Both pseudorecombinants were infectious in , and . Enhanced pathogenicity was observed when DNA-A of ToLCNDV-[IN:ND:Svr:92] was -complemented with ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] DNA-B, and was consistently associated with an increase in accumulation of ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] DNA-B. Mixed infection of ToLCNDV-[IN:ND:Svr:92] and ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] always showed extremely severe symptoms, suggesting a synergistic interaction between these two viruses. Southern blot analysis of viral DNAs from infected plants showed a significantly higher level of accumulation of both ToLCNDV components and DNA-B of ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] with no alteration to levels of DNA-A of ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01]. Symptom development and/or higher infectivity of the supervirulent pseudorecombinants correlated with the increased levels of DNA-B accumulation. Protoplast replication assays revealed that enhanced infectivity by the pseudorecombinant occurred at the level of replication, as DNA-A of ToLCNDV-[IN:ND:Svr:92] enhanced ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] DNA-B replication, whose accumulation was in turn increased by ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] DNA-A. This is the first report demonstrating a virulent pseudorecombinant between two distinct species of begomoviruses that infect tomato, and is the second report on synergism between begomoviruses. The results revealed that ToLCGV-[IN:Var:01] DNA-B is capable of associating with different DNA-A components, despite having different iteron sequences.

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2008-03-01
2019-09-20
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