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Abstract

Plum pox virus (PPV) populations from peaches are able to adapt consistently to herbaceous hosts, characterized by a reduction in time to symptom development, increases in inoculation efficiency and increased titres. PPV adaptation was studied by using pea () as an alternative host. Two isolates of PPV from peaches were inoculated and passaged in peas ten times using either aphid or mechanical inoculation, generating four independent passage lines. Mechanical-transmission efficiency from peach to pea improved from 3 % at passage 1 to 100 % by serial passage 4 on peas. Inoculation using aphid vectors required six to ten serial passages in pea to reach a peak of 50–60 % transmission efficiency. Sequence analyses of all four PPV population lines inoculated sequentially to pea identified a specific mutation occurring consistently in the NIb gene when compared with the same PPV isolates passaged in parallel in peach. The mutation allowed PPV to replicate up to 20 times faster in the new host. Pea-adapted strains of PPV at every passage were also tested for their ability to infect the original host, peach. Regardless of the number of previous passages, all pea-adapted PPV strains consistently infected peach at low levels using aphid inoculation.

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2007-10-01
2019-11-15
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vol. , part 10, pp. 2839 – 2845

The ten different primer pairs used in this study [ PDF] (59 KB)



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