1887

Abstract

To understand the mechanisms involved in protective immunity to African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, the observation that infection with the avirulent Portuguese ASFV isolate OUR/T88/3 protects outbred pigs from challenge with the virulent Portuguese ASFV isolate OUR/T88/1 was exploited. It was demonstrated that pigs exposed to OUR/T88/3 and then depleted of CD8 lymphocytes were no longer fully protected from OUR/T88/1 challenge. This indicated that CD8 lymphocytes play an important role in the protective immune response to ASFV infection and that anti-ASFV antibody alone, from OUR/T88/3 infection, was not sufficient to protect pigs from OUR/T88/1 challenge. Inbred pigs of the cc haplotype infected with OUR/T88/3 were not always protected from OUR/T88/1 challenge and developed both viraemia and fever. Such viraemia was always correlated with increased numbers of circulating CD8 lymphocytes, indicating a specific role for CD8 lymphocytes in combating viraemia. These experiments indicate an important role for CD8 lymphocytes, particularly CD8 lymphocytes, in ASF protective immunity.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/vir.0.81038-0
2005-09-01
2020-10-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/86/9/vir862445.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/vir.0.81038-0&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Boinas F. S., Hutchings G. H., Dixon L. K., Wilkinson P. J. 2004; Characterization of pathogenic and non-pathogenic African swine fever virus isolates from Ornithodoros erraticus inhabiting pig premises in Portugal. J Gen Virol 85:2177–2187 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. De Boer C. J. 1967; Studies to determine neutralizing antibody in sera from animals recovered from African swine fever and laboratory animals inoculated with African virus with adjuvants. Arch Gesamte Virusforsch 20:164–179 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Gomez-Puertas P., Rodriguez F., Oviedo J. M., Brun A., Alonso C., Escribano J. M. 1998; The African swine fever virus proteins p54 and p30 are involved in two distinct steps of virus attachment and both contribute to the antibody-mediated protective immune response. Virology 243:461–471 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Jenson J. S., Childerstone A., Takamatsu H. H., Dixon L. K., Parkhouse R. M. E. 2000; The cellular immune recognition of proteins expressed by an African swine fever virus random genomic library. J Immunol Methods 242:33–42 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Leitao A., Cartaxeiro C., Coelho R., Cruz B., Parkhouse R. M. E., Portugal F. C., Vigario J. D., Martins C. L. V. 2001; The non-haemadsorbing African swine fever virus isolate ASFV/NH/P68 provides a model for defining the protective anti-virus immune response. J Gen Virol 82:513–523
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Malmquist W. A. 1963; Serologic and immunologic studies with African swine fever virus. Am J Vet Res 24:450–459
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Malmquist W. A., Hay D. 1960; Hemadsorption and cytopathic effect produced by African swine fever virus in swine bone marrow and buffy coat cultures. Am J Vet Res 21:104–108
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Martins C. L. V., Lawman M. J. P., Scholl T., Mebus C. A., Lunney J. K. 1993; African swine fever virus specific porcine cytotoxic T cell activity. Arch Virol 129:211–225 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Neilan J. G., Zsak L., Lu Z., Burrage T. G., Kutish G. F., Rock D. L. 2004; Neutralizing antibodies to African swine fever virus proteins p30, p54, and p72 are not sufficient for antibody-mediated protection. Virology 319:337–342 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Office International des Epizooties; 1996; African swine fever. In OIE Manual pp  137–143 Edited by OIE Paris: OIE;
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Onisk D. V., Borca M. V., Kutish G., Kramer E., Irusta P., Rock D. L. 1994; Passively transferred African swine fever virus antibodies protect swine against lethal infection. Virology 198:350–354 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Pescovitz M. D., Lunney J. K., Sachs D. H. 1985; Murine anti-swine T4 and T8 monoclonal antibodies: distribution and effects on proliferative and cytotoxic T cells. J Immunol 134:37–44
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Plowright W., Thomson G. R., Neser J. A. 1994; African swine fever. In Infectious Diseases of Livestock vol. 1 pp  568–599 Edited by Coetzer J. A. W., Thomson G. R., Tustin R. C. Oxford: Oxford University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Ramiro-Ibanez F., Ortega A., Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Escribano J. M., Alonso C. 1997; Modulation of immune cell populations and activation markers in the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus infection. Virus Res 47:31–40 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Revilla Y., Pena L., Vinuela E. 1992; Interferon- γ production by African swine fever virus-specific lymphocytes. Scand J Immunol 35:225–230 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Carnero M. E., Bruyel V. 1983; Immunological responses of pigs to partially attenuated African swine fever virus and their resistance to virulent homologous and heterologous viruses. In African Swine Fever , EUR 8466 EN, Proceedings of CEC/FAO Research Seminar Sardinia, Italy: September, 1981 pp  206–216 Edited by Wilkinson P. J. Luxemburg, Belgium: Commission of the European Communities;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Caballero C., Martinez J., Carnero M. E. 1986; Neutralization of African swine fever virus by sera from African swine fever resistant pigs. Am J Vet Res 47:1858–1862
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Rodriguez F., Escribano J. M. 1996; Functional and immunological properties of the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin of African swine fever virus. Virology 218:285–289 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Saalmüller A. 1996; Characterization of swine leukocyte differentiation antigens. Immunol Today 17:351
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Saalmüller A., Werner T., Fachinger V. 2002; T-helper cells from naive to committed. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 87:137–145 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Sachs D. H., Leight G., Coone J., Schwartz S., Stuart C., Rosenberg S. 1976; Transplantation in miniature swine. I. Fixation of major the histocompatibility complex. Transplantation 22:559–567 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Wardley R. C., Norley S. G., Wilkinson P. J., Williams S. 1985; The role of antibody in protection against African swine fever virus. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 9:201–212 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Yang H., Parkhouse R. M. E. 1996; Phenotypic classification of porcine lymphocyte subpopulations in blood and lymphoid tissues. Immunology 89:76–83 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Yang H., Parkhouse R. M. E. 1997; Differential expression of CD8 epitopes amongst porcine CD8-positive functional lymphocyte subsets. Immunology 92:45–52 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Yang H., Parkhouse R. M. E. 2000; Characterization of the porcine γδ T-cell receptor structure and cellular distribution by monoclonal antibody PPT27. Immunology 99:504–509 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Zsak L., Onisk D. V., Afonso C. L., Rock D. L. 1993; Virulent African swine fever virus isolates are neutralised by swine immune serum and by monoclonal antibodies recognising a 72-kDa viral protein. Virology 196:596–602 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/vir.0.81038-0
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/vir.0.81038-0
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error