1887

Abstract

A consensus sequence of the (FCoV) (strain FIPV WSU-79/1146) genome was determined from overlapping cDNA fragments produced by RT-PCR amplification of viral RNA. The genome was found to be 29 125 nt in length, excluding the poly(A) tail. Analysis of the sequence identified conserved open reading frames and revealed an overall genome organization similar to that of other coronaviruses. The genomic RNA was analysed for putative -acting elements and the pattern of subgenomic mRNA synthesis was analysed by Northern blotting. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted FCoV proteins identified 16 replicase proteins (nsp1–nsp16) and four structural proteins (spike, membrane, envelope and nucleocapsid). Two mRNAs encoding putative accessory proteins were also detected. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that FIPV WSU-79/1146 belongs to the coronavirus subgroup G1-1. These results confirm and extend previous findings from partial sequence analysis of FCoV genomes.

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2005-08-01
2019-11-12
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Supplements

vol. , part 8, pp. 2249 – 2253

Models of the FIPV WSU-79/1146 RNA 5´ UTR -acting elements.

Model of the FIPV WSU-79/1146 RNA 3´ UTR -acting element.

Model of the FIPV WSU-79/1146 ribosomal frameshifting element.

List of oligonucleotide primers used for RT-PCR amplification of FIPV WSU-79/1146 RNA.

FIPV WSU-79/1146 genomic ORFs and encoded non-structural and structural proteins.

Main features of FIPV WSU-79/1146 structural proteins.

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