1887

Abstract

(RPV) is a morbillivirus, related closely to the human pathogen (MV). Although cell culture-adapted strains of RPV can infect many kinds of cell from different hosts, one such strain has previously been shown to have a detectable preference for cells expressing the MV receptor CD150 (SLAM), a protein found only on certain types of activated T cells, B cells and dendritic cells. Here, it is shown that the wild-type, virulent parent of the most common vaccine strain of RPV requires CD150 as a receptor, whilst the cell culture-adapted vaccine strain has acquired the ability to use heparan sulphate as an alternative receptor.

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2005-06-01
2020-07-14
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