1887

Abstract

BRCA1-associated protein 2 (BRAP2) is known to interact with the kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1), inhibiting the ERK signal transduction cascade. This study found that an Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein, Rta, is a binding partner of BRAP2 in yeast and confirmed the binding by a glutathione -transferase pull-down assay and by co-immunoprecipitation in 293(maxi-EBV) cells. Binding studies also showed that Rta and KSR1 interacted with the C-terminal 202 aa region in BRAP2. Additionally, Rta appeared to prevent the binding of KSR1 to BRAP2, activating the ERK signal transduction pathway and the transcription of an EBV immediate-early gene, . Activation of the ERK signal transduction pathway by Rta may be critical for the maintenance of the lytic state of EBV.

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2008-10-01
2020-08-11
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