1887

Abstract

The RNA segment encoding the guanylyltransferase (VP3) from 12 group A rotavirus isolates has been sequenced following RT-PCR and molecular cloning of the full-length amplicons produced. Alignment of the derived amino acid sequences including those of the four VP3 sequences available from GenBank revealed two levels of sequence divergence. Virus isolates from humans showed greater than 94 % sequence identity, whereas those isolated from different mammalian species showed as low as 79 % sequence identity. The exceptions were avian virus isolates, which diverged ∼45 % from those of mammalian origin, and the human virus isolates DS1 and 69M, which showed much closer (over 90 %) identity to viruses of bovine origin, suggesting that these human isolates may have undergone recent reassortment events with a bovine virus. Analysis of the sequences for a putative enzymic active site has revealed that the KXTAMDXEXP and KXXGNNH motifs around amino acids 385 and 545, respectively, are conserved across both group A and C rotaviruses.

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2004-04-01
2019-11-12
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