1887

Abstract

studies have established that the latency-associated nuclear antigen encoded by human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and the related ORF73 gene product of herpesvirus saimiri interact with virus origins of replication to facilitate maintenance of episomal DNA. Such a function implies a critical role for ORF73 in the establishment and maintenance of latency . To determine the role of ORF73 in virus pathogenesis, the ORF73 gene product encoded by murine herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) was disrupted by making an ORF73 deletion mutant, Δ73, and an independent ORF73 frameshift mutant, FS73. The effect of the mutations introduced in ORF73 on MHV-68 pathogenesis was analysed using a well-characterized murine model system. These studies have revealed that ORF73 is not required for efficient lytic replication either or . In contrast, a severe latency deficit is observed in splenocytes of animals infected with an ORF73 mutant, as assessed by infectious centre reactivation assay or by hybridization detection of latent virus. Assessment of viral genome-positive cells in sorted splenocyte populations confirmed the absence of ORF73 mutant virus from splenic latency reservoirs, including germinal centre B cells. These data indicate a crucial role for ORF73 in the establishment of latency and for virus persistence in the host.

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2003-12-01
2020-09-18
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