1887

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA)-6 is essential for EBV-induced immortalization of primary human B-lymphocytes . Previous studies have shown that EBNA-6 acts as a transcriptional regulator of viral and cellular genes; however at present, few functional domains of the 140 kDa EBNA-6 protein have been completely characterized. There are five computer-predicted nuclear localization signals (NLS), four monopartite and one bipartite, present in the EBNA-6 amino acid sequence. To identify which of these NLS are functional, fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and deletion constructs of EBNA-6 were expressed in HeLa cells. Each of the constructs containing at least one of the NLS was targeted to the nucleus of cells whereas a construct lacking all of the NLS was cytoplasmic. Site-directed mutation of these NLS demonstrated that only three of the NLS were functional, one at the N-terminal end (aa 72–80), one in the middle (aa 412–418) and one at the C-terminal end (aa 939–945) of the EBNA-6 protein.

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2004-01-01
2020-07-08
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