1887

Abstract

The three South African Territories (SAT) types of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) display great genetic and antigenic diversity, resulting from the independent evolution of these viruses in different geographical localities. For effective control of the disease in such areas, the use of custom-made vaccines is required. To circumvent the tedious process of vaccine strain selection, an alternative in the control process is being investigated. Specifically, it is proposed to replace the antigenic determinants of an infectious genome-length cDNA copy of a good SAT vaccine strain with those of appropriate field strains, producing custom-made FMDV chimeras for use in vaccine production. Here the construction of an infectious genome-length cDNA copy of the SAT2 vaccine strain, ZIM/7/83, is described, created utilizing an exchange-cassette strategy with an existing A genome-length cDNA clone. The virus derived from this cDNA (designated vSAT2) displayed excellent growth properties in cell culture, indicating its potential usefulness in the production of custom-made vaccine strains. Evaluation of the growth of various SAT2/A12 chimeras created during the derivation of SAT2 infectious cDNA suggested incompatibilities between the non-structural proteins of ZIM/7/83 and the 5′ UTR of A.

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2004-01-01
2019-10-15
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