1887

Abstract

Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were employed to select neutralization escape mutants of equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV). Amino acid changes in the ERAV mutants resulting in resistance to neutralization were identified in capsid protein VP1 at Lys-114, Pro-240 and Thr-241. Although the changes were located in different parts of the polypeptide chain, these mutants exhibited cross-resistance against all four mAbs employed, indicating that these residues contribute to a single immunogenic site. To explain this result, we constructed a model of the three-dimensional structure of the ERAV capsid based on comparison with the closely related foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV O). According to this model, VP1 is folded so that Lys-114 is in the E–F loop of the polypeptide chain at a considerable distance from Pro-240 and Trp-241 in the C-terminal region. However, around the fivefold axis of symmetry, the C terminus of VP1 in each protomer extends to the E–F loop of the adjacent VP1 in the next protomer. We therefore propose that the immunogenic site in ERAV is formed as a result of the close proximity of the Lys-114 residue in the E–F loop of one VP1 molecule and of the Pro-240/Thr-241 residues in the adjacent VP1 polypeptide chain. In terms of the overall architecture of the viral capsid structure, this site in ERAV most closely resembles the immunogenic site 1 of FMDV O.

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2003-09-01
2020-07-06
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