1887

Abstract

After serially undiluted passage of multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV), persistently infected Se301 cells were established. A cell strain, in which no polyhedra or viral particles were observed, was cloned and designated P8-Se301-C1. The P8-Se301-C1 cells are morphologically similar to but grow slower than Se301 cells and they can homologously interfere with SeMNPV. PCR analysis showed that SeMNPV and genes were present but and genes were absent in P8-Se301-C1, suggesting that the cells harbour incomplete SeMNPV genomes. Dot-blot analysis demonstrated that 0.32±0.16 ng SeMNPV DNA was present in 1.25×10 P8-Se301-C1 cells. A quantitative real-time PCR assay showed that there were 13.2±4.3 copies of the SeMNPV gene in each cell. Nested RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of SeMNPV transcripts in P8-Se301-C1 cells. The fact that P8-Se301-C1 cells carry low levels of partial viral genome but do not produce viral progeny suggests a latent-like viral infection in the cells.

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2009-12-01
2019-11-14
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