1887

Abstract

Avian G18P[17] rotaviruses with similar complete genome constellation, including strains that showed pathogenicity in mammals, have been detected worldwide. However, it remains unclear how these strains spread geographically. In this study, to investigate the role of migratory birds in the dispersion of avian rotaviruses, we analysed whole genetic characters of the rotavirus strain RK1 that was isolated from a migratory species of birds [velvet scoter ()] in Japan in 1989. Genetic analyses revealed that the genotype constellation of the RK1 strain, G18-P[17]-I4-R4-C4-M4-A21-N4-T4-E4-H4, was highly consistent with those of other G18P[17] strains detected in various parts of the world, supporting the possibility that the G18P[17] strains spread via migratory birds that move over a wide area. Furthermore, the RK1 strain induced diarrhoea in suckling mice after oral gastric inoculation, indicating that at least some of the rotaviruses that originated from migratory birds are infectious to and pathogenic in mammals. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that migratory birds may contribute to the global spread of avian rotaviruses that are pathogenic in mammalian species.

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2022-02-17
2022-07-06
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