1887

Abstract

The matrix protein of many enveloped RNA viruses regulates multiple stages of viral life cycle and has the characteristics of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. We have previously demonstrated that matrix protein 1 (M1) of an RNA virus, influenza virus, blocks host cell cycle progression by interacting with SLD5, a member of the GINS complex, which is required for normal cell cycle progression. In this study, we found that M protein of several other RNA viruses, including VSV, SeV and HIV, interacted with SLD5. Furthermore, VSV/SeV infection and M protein of VSV/SeV/HIV induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Importantly, overexpression of SLD5 partially rescued the cell cycle arrest by VSV/SeV infection and VSV M protein. In addition, SLD5 suppressed VSV replication and , and enhanced type Ⅰ interferon signalling. Taken together, our results suggest that targeting SLD5 by M protein might be a common strategy used by multiple enveloped RNA viruses to block host cell cycle. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights for virus to manipulate cell cycle progression by hijacking host replication factor SLD5 during infection.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 91749112)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MinFang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31970164)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MinFang
  • State Key Laboratory of veterinary biotechnology (Award SKLVBF201901)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MinFang
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-12-09
2022-01-28
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