1887

Abstract

Dengue virus (DENV), like other viruses, closely interacts with the host cell machinery to complete its life cycle. Over the course of infection, DENV interacts with several host factors with pro-viral activities to support its infection. Meanwhile, it has to evade or counteract host factors with anti-viral activities which inhibit its infection. These molecular virus-host interactions play a crucial role in determining the success of DENV infection. Deciphering such interactions is thus paramount to understanding viral fitness in its natural hosts. While DENV-mammalian host interactions have been extensively studied, not much has been done to characterize DENV-mosquito host interactions despite its importance in controlling DENV transmission. Here, to provide a snapshot of our current understanding of DENV-mosquito interactions, we review the literature that identified host factors and cellular processes related to DENV infection in its mosquito vectors, and , with a particular focus on DENV-mosquito omics studies. This knowledge provides fundamental insights into the DENV life cycle, and could contribute to the development of novel antiviral strategies.

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2021-11-30
2022-01-29
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