1887

Abstract

Influenza virus causes seasonal epidemics and sporadic pandemics resulting in morbidity, mortality, and economic losses worldwide. Understanding how to regulate influenza virus replication is important for developing vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Identifying microRNAs (miRs) that affect host genes used by influenza virus for replication can support an antiviral strategy. In this study, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and ion channel (IC) host genes in human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells used by influenza virus for replication (Orr-Burks , 2021) were examined as miR target genes following A/CA/04/09- or B/Yamagata/16/1988 replication. Thirty-three miRs were predicted to target GPCR or IC genes and their miR mimics were evaluated for their ability to decrease influenza virus replication. Paired miR inhibitors were used as an ancillary measure to confirm or not the antiviral effects of a miR mimic. Fifteen miRs lowered influenza virus replication and four miRs were found to reduce replication irrespective of virus strain and type differences. These findings provide evidence for novel miR disease intervention strategies for influenza viruses.

Keyword(s): GPCR , influenza , ion channel and microRNA
Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) (Award HSN2662007000006C)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RalphA. Tripp
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) (Award HHSN2722014000004C)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RalphA. Tripp
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2021-11-17
2024-02-28
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