1887

Abstract

(PYVV) was detected in potatoes grown in the Central highlands, north of Bogotá (~3000 m altitude), Colombia. At this altitude viral whitefly vectors are largely absent, but infection persists because of the use of uncertified tubers. Plants with typical PYVV-induced yellowing symptoms, as well as with atypical yellowing or non-symptomatic symptoms were sampled at three separate geographical locations. PYVV presence was assessed by RT-PCR, and several plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of their small RNA (sRNA) populations. Complete or almost complete sequences of four PYVV isolates were thus reconstructed, all from symptomatic plants. Three viral isolates infected plants singly, while the fourth co-infected the plant together with a potyvirus. Relative proportions of sRNAs to each of the three crinivirus genomic RNAs were found to remain comparable among the four infections. Genomic regions were identified as hotspots of sRNA formation, or as regions that poorly induced sRNAs. Furthermore, PYVV titres in the mixed versus single infections remained comparable, indicating an absence of synergistic/antagonistic effects of the potyvirus on the accumulation of PYVV. Daughter plants raised in the greenhouse from tubers of the infected, field-sampled plants displayed mild PYVV infection symptoms that disappeared with time, demonstrating the occurrence of recovery and asymptomatic infection phenotypes in this pathosystem.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Universidad Militar Nueva Granada (Award project CIAS 1901)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LilianaFranco-Lara
  • Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (ES) (Award PID2019-109304RB-I00)
    • Principle Award Recipient: TomasCanto
  • Fundación General CSIC (ES) (Award COOPB20310)
    • Principle Award Recipient: TomasCanto
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001604
2021-06-07
2022-01-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/102/6/jgv001604.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001604&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Salazar LF, Muller G, Querci M, Zapata JL, Owens RA. Potato yellow vein virus: its host range, distribution in South America and identification as a crinivirus transmitted by Trialeurodes vaporariorum. Ann Appl Biol 2000; 137:7–19 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Salazar LF. Emerging and re-emerging potato diseases in the Andes. Potato Res 2006; 49:43–47
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Guzmán-Barney M, Franco-Lara L, Rodríguez D, Vargas L, Fierro JE. Yield losses in Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja cultivar Criolla Colombia in plants with symptoms of PYVV in field trials. Am J Potato Res 2012; 89:438–447 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Rincón DF, Vásquez DF, Rivera-Trujillo HF, Beltrán C, Borrero-Echeverry F. Economic injury levels for the potato yellow vein disease and its vector, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), affecting potato crops in the Andes. Crop Prot 2019; 119:52–58 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Machida-Hirano R. Diversity of potato genetic resources. Breed Sci 2015; 65:26–40 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Spooner DM, Ghislain M, Simon R, Jansky SH, Gavrilenko T. Systematics, diversity, genetics, and evolution of wild and cultivated potatoes. Bot Rev 2014; 80:283–383
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Guzmán-Barney M, Hernández AK, Franco-Lara L. Tracking foliar symptoms caused by tuber-borne Potato Yellow Vein Virus (PYVV) in Solanum Phureja (Juz et Buk) Cultivar “Criolla Colombia. Am J Potato Res 2013; 90:284–293 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Franco-Lara L, Rodríguez D, Guzmán-Barney M. Prevalence of Potato yellow vein virus (PYVV) in Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja Fields in Three States of Colombia. Am J Potato Res 2013; 90:324–330 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Livieratos IC, Eliasco E, Müller G, Olsthoorn RCL, Salazar LF. Analysis of the RNA of Potato yellow vein virus: Evidence for a tripartite genome and conserved 3′-terminal structures among members of the genus Crinivirus. J Gen Virol 2004; 85:2065–2075 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Martelli GP, Agranovsky AA, Bar-Joseph M, Boscia D, Candresse T. Family Closteroviridae. King A, Adams M, Carstens E, Lefkowitz E. eds In Virus taxonomy. Ninth report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of viruses Amster- dam: Elsevier-Academic Press; 2011 pp 987–1001
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Tzanetakis IE, Martin RR, Wintermantel WM. Epidemiology of criniviruses: An emerging problem in world agriculture. Front Microbiol 2013; 4:1–15 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Karasev AV. Genetic diversity and evolution of closteroviruses. Annu Rev Phytopathol 2000; 38:293–324 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Álvarez D, Gutiérrez P, Marín M. Secuenciación del genoma del Potato yellow vein virus (PYVV) y desarrollo de una prueba molecular para su detección. Bioagro 2017; 29:3–14
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Muñoz Baena L, Gutiérrez Sánchez PA, Marín Montoya M. Secuenciación del genoma completo del Potato yellow vein virus (PYVV) en tomate (Solanum lycopersicum) en Colombia. Acta biol Colomb 2017; 22:5 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gallo Y, Toro LF, Jaramillo H, Gutiérrez PA, Marín M. Identificación y caracterización molecular del genoma completo de tres virus en cultivos de lulo (Solanum quitoense) de Antioquia (Colombia. Rev Colomb Cienc Hortíc 2018; 12:281–292
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Villamil-Garzón A, Cuellar WJ, Guzmán-Barney M. Natural co-infection of Solanum tuberosum crops by the Potato yellow vein virus and potyvirus in Colombia. Agron colomb 2014; 32:213–223 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Langmead B, Trapnell C, Pop M, Salzberg SL. Ultrafast and memory-efficient alignment of short DNA sequences to the human genome. Genome Biol 2009; 10:R25 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium Xu X, Pan S, Cheng S, Zhang B et al. Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium. Genome sequence and analysis of the tuber crop potato. Nature 2011; 475:189–195 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Zheng Y, Gao S, Padmanabhan C, Li R, Galvez M. VirusDetect: an automated pipeline for efficient virus discovery using deep sequencing of small RNAs. Virology 2017; 500:130–138 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Varvara I, Maliogka VI, Wintermantel WM, Orfanidou CG, Katis NI. Criniviruses infecting vegetable crops. In applied plant biotechnology for improving resistance to biotic stress Academic Press; 2020 pp 225–250
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Karyeija RF, Kreuze JF, Gibson RW, Valkonen JPT. Synergistic interactions of a potyvirus and a phloem-limited crinivirus in sweet potato plants. Virology 2000; 269:26–36 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Untiveros M, Fuentes S, Salazar L. Synergistic interaction of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (Crinivirus) with Carla-, Cucumo-, Ipomo-, and Potyviruses Infecting Sweet Potato. Plant Dis 2007; 91:669–676 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Abrahamian P, Sobh H, Seblani R, Abou-Jawdah Y. Co-infection of two Criniviruses and a Begomovirus enhances the disease severity in cucumber. Eur J Plant Pathol 2015; 142:521–530 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Golyaev V, Candresse T, Rabenstein F, Pooggin MM. Plant virome reconstruction and antiviral RNAi characterization by deep sequencing of small RNAs from dried leaves. Sci Rep 2019; 9:1–10 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Gallo García Y, Sierra Mejía A, Donaire Segarra L, Aranda MA, Gutiérrez PA. Natural coinfection of RNA viruses in potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigena) crops in Antioquia (Colombia. Acta Biol Colomb 2019; 24:546–560
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Roossinck MJ, Martin DP, Roumagnac P. Plant virus metagenomics: Advances in virus discovery. Phytopathology 2015; 105:716–727 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Sierra Mejía A, Gallo García Y, Estrada Arteaga M, Gutiérrez AP, Marín Montoya M. Molecular Detection of Six RNA Viruses in Tuber Sprouts of Potato Solanum phureja) in Antioquia, Colombia. Bioagro: 2020 pp 3–14
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Wang J, Turina M, Medina V, Falk BW. Synergistic interaction between the Potyvirus, Turnip mosaic virus and the Crinivirus, Lettuce infectious yellows virus in plants and protoplasts. Virus Res 2009; 144:163–170 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Domingo-Calap ML, Moreno AB, Díaz Pendón JA, Moreno A, Fereres A. Assessing the impact on virus transmission and insect vector behavior of a viral mixed infection in melon. Phytopathology 2019; 110:174–186 [View Article][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Muñoz ED, Gutiérrez SP, Marín MM. Detection and genome characterization of Potato virus Y isolates infecting potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in La Union (Antioquia, Colombia. Agron Colomb 2016; 34:317–328
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Rodríguez PA, Franco-Lara L, Guzmán Barney M. Inter and intra variation of Potato yellow vein virus in Three Potato Species from Colombia. Rev Fac Nal Agr Medellín 2015; 68:7387–7398
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Bertschinger L, Bühler L, Dupuis B, Duffy B, Gessler C. Incomplete infection of secondarily infected potato plants – an environment dependent underestimated mechanism in plant virology. Front Plant Sci 2017; 8:1–13 [View Article]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001604
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001604
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary material 1

PDF

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error