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Abstract

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has caused a pandemic with tens of millions of cases and more than a million deaths. The infection causes COVID-19, a disease of the respiratory system of divergent severity. No treatment exists. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major component of green tea, has several beneficial properties, including antiviral activities. Therefore, we examined whether EGCG has antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2. EGCG blocked not only the entry of SARS-CoV-2, but also MERS- and SARS-CoV pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and inhibited virus infections . Mechanistically, inhibition of the SARS-CoV-2 spike–receptor interaction was observed. Thus, EGCG might be suitable for use as a lead structure to develop more effective anti-COVID-19 drugs.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (Award TTU 01.802)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MichaelD. Mühlebach
  • Bundesministerium für Gesundheit (Award CHARIS 6a)
    • Principle Award Recipient: S SchnierleBarbara
  • Bundesministerium für Gesundheit (Award CHARIS 6b)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MichaelD. Mühlebach
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The Microbiology Society waived the open access fees for this article.
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001574
2021-04-08
2021-10-28
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