1887

Abstract

Rabies is a lethal disease caused by Rabies lyssavirus, commonly known as rabies virus (RABV), and results in nearly 100 % death once clinical symptoms occur in human and animals. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be associated with viral infection. But the role of lncRNAs involved in RABV infection is still elusive. In this study, we performed global transcriptome analysis of both of lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in wild-type (WT) and lab-attenuated RABV-infected mouse brains by using next-generation sequencing. The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were analysed by using the edgeR package. We identified 1422 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 4475 differentially expressed mRNAs by comparing WT and lab-attenuated RABV-infected brains. Then we predicted the enriched biological pathways by the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database based on the differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs. Our analysis revealed the relationships between lncRNAs and RABV-infection-associated immune response and ion transport-related pathways, which provide a fresh insight into the potential role of lncRNA in immune evasion and neuron injury induced by WT RABV.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31872451)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LingZhao
  • National Program on Key Research Project of China (Award 2016YFD0500400)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LingZhao
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001538
2020-12-07
2021-10-25
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