1887

Abstract

(BSBV) is a sugar beet pomovirus frequently associated with , the causal agent of the rhizomania disease. BSBV has been detected in most of the major beet-growing regions worldwide, yet its impact on this crop remains unclear. With the aim to understand the life cycle of this virus and clarify its putative pathogenicity, agroinfectious clones have been engineered for each segment of its tripartite genome. The biological properties of these clones were then studied on different plant species. Local infection was obtained on agroinfiltrated leaves of . On leaves of , similar results were obtained, but only when heterologous viral suppressors of RNA silencing were co-expressed or in a transgenic line down regulated for both dicer-like protein 2 and 4. On sugar beet, local infection following agroinoculation was obtained on cotyledons, but not on other tested plant parts. Nevertheless, leaf symptoms were observed on this host via sap inoculation. Likewise, roots were efficiently mechanically infected, highlighting low frequency of root necrosis and constriction, and enabling the demonstration of transmission by the vector . Altogether, the entire viral cycle was reproduced, validating the constructed agroclones as efficient inoculation tools, paving the way for further studies on BSBV and its related pathosystem.

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2020-11-20
2020-12-04
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