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Abstract

Bunyamwera (BUNV), Batai (BATV) and Ngari (NRIV) are mosquito-borne viruses that are members of the genus in the order Bunyavirales. These three viruses are enveloped with single-stranded, negative-sense RNA genomes consiting of three segments, denoted as Small (S), Medium (M) and Large (L). Ngari is thought to be the natural reassortant progeny of Bunyamwera and Batai viruses. The relationship between these ‘parental’ viruses and the ‘progeny’ poses an interesting question, especially given that there is overlap in their respective transmission ecologies, but differences in their infection host ranges and pathogenesis. We compared the kinetics of these three viruses in a common laboratory system and found no significant difference in growth kinetics. There was, however, a tendency of BATV to have smaller plaques than either BUNV or NRIV. Furthermore, we determined that all three viruses are stable in extracellular conditions and retain infectivity for a week in non-cellular media, which has public health and biosafety implications. The study of this understudied group of viruses addresses a need for basic characterization of viruses that have not yet reached epidemic transmission intensity, but that have the potential due to their infectivity to both human and animal hosts. These results lay the groundwork for future studies of these neglected viruses of potential public and One Health importance.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • United States Agency for International Development (Award BFS- G-11-00002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RebeccaC Christofferson
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2020-12-01
2021-07-29
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