1887

Abstract

Nearly 1.7 million cases of dog bites are reported every year in India and many cases of animal rabies are left unattended and undiagnosed. Therefore, a mere diagnosis of rabies is not sufficient to understand the epidemiology and the spread of the rabies virus (RV) in animals. There is a paucity of information about the evolutionary dynamics of RV in dogs and its biodiversity patterns in India. In total, 50 dog-brain samples suspected of rabies were screened by the nucleoprotein- (N) and glycoprotein- (G) gene PCR. The N and G genes were subsequently sequenced to understand the molecular evolution in these genes. The phylogenetic analysis of the N gene revealed that six isolates in the Mumbai region belonged to a single Arctic lineage. Time-scaled phylogeny by Bayesian coalescent analysis of the partial N gene revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for the sequences belonged to the cluster from 2006.68 with a highest posterior density of 95 % betweeen 2005–2008, which is assigned to Indian lineage I. Migration pattern revealed a strong Bayes factor between Mumbai to Delhi, Panji to Hyderabad, Delhi to Chennai, and Chennai to Chandigarh. Phylogenetic analysis of the G gene revealed that the RVs circulating in the Mumbai region are divided into three lineages. Time-scaled phylogeny by the Bayesian coalescent analysis method estimated that the TMRCA for sequences under study was from 1993 and Indian clusters was from 1962. In conclusion, the phylogenetic analysis of the N gene revealed that six isolates belonged to single Arctic lineages along with other Indian isolates and they were clustered into a single lineage but divided into three clades based on the G-gene sequences. The present study highlights and enhances the current molecular epidemiology and evolution of RV and revealed strong location bias and geographical clustering within Indian isolates on the basis of N and G genes.

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2021-02-05
2021-10-25
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