1887

Abstract

Species A rotaviruses (RVAs) are a major cause of gastroenteritis in animals and humans. Their genome consists of 11 segments of dsRNA, and reassortment events between animal and human strains can contribute to the high genetic diversity of RVAs. We used a plasmid-based reverse genetics system to investigate the reassortment potential of the genome segment encoding the viral outer capsid protein VP4, which is a major antigenic determinant, mediates viral entry and plays an important role in host cell tropism. We rescued reassortant viruses containing VP4 from porcine, bovine, bat, pheasant or chicken RVA strains in the backbone of simian strain SA11. The VP4 reassortants could be stably passaged in MA-104 cells and induced cytopathic effects. However, analysis of growth kinetics revealed marked differences in replication efficiency. Our results show that the VP4-encoding genome segment has a high reassortment potential, even between virus strains from highly divergent species. This can result in replication-competent reassortants with new genomic, growth and antigenic features.

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2019-10-30
2019-11-21
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