1887

Abstract

Ebola virus (EBOV) VP40 is a major driving force of nascent virion production and a negative regulator of genome replication/transcription. Here, we showed that the YIGL sequence at the C-terminus of EBOV VP40 is important for virus-like particle (VLP) production and the regulation of genome replication/transcription. Accordingly, a mutation in the YIGL sequence caused defects in VLP production and genome replication/transcription. The residues I293 and L295 in the YIGL sequence were particularly critical for VLP production. Furthermore, an in silico analysis indicated that the amino acids surrounding the YIGL sequence contribute to intramolecular interactions within VP40. Among those surrounding residues, F209 was shown to be critical for VLP production. These results suggested that the VP40 YIGL sequence regulates two different viral replication steps, VLP production and genome replication/transcription, and the nearby residue F209 influences VLP production.

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2019-06-11
2019-10-17
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