1887

Abstract

West Nile Virus, Usutu virus, Bagaza virus, Israel turkey encephalitis virus and Tembusu virus currently constitute the five flaviviruses transmitted by mosquito bites with a marked pathogenicity for birds. They have been identified as the causative agents of severe neurological symptoms, drop in egg production and/or mortalities among avian hosts. They have also recently shown an expansion of their geographic distribution and/or a rise in cases of human infection. This paper is the first up-to-date review of the pathology of these flaviviruses in birds, with a special emphasis on the difference in susceptibility among avian species, in order to understand the specificity of the host spectrum of each of these viruses. Furthermore, given the lack of a clear prophylactic approach against these viruses in birds, a meta-analysis of vaccination trials conducted to date on these animals is given to constitute a solid platform from which designing future studies.

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2019-01-22
2019-10-14
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